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I have a User class that has a property called Creator which is of type User (the user who created this user)

public class User {

    public User()
    {
        UserName = "";
        EmailAddress = "";
    }

    public String UserName { get; set; }
    public String EmailAddress { get; set; }
    //bunch of other properties

    public User Creator { get; set; }
}

I am getting a Stackoverflow exception on the line UserName = "";. I am assuming it is because of the Creator property getting stuck in a big loop. Why does this happen if I haven't set Creator to a new User? Is there a way I can stop this from happening?

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11  
What do the UserName and EmailAddress properties look like? –  thecoop Nov 17 '10 at 16:03
3  
You need to post code that 1) Compile 2) Reproduces the error –  Albin Sunnanbo Nov 17 '10 at 16:06
    
Please check how you have implemented UserName or any property which is referenced by UserName. If possible, please post the code here. –  Nitin Midha Nov 17 '10 at 16:07
2  
He's posting a Stackoverflow issue on Stackoverflow :) –  m-y Nov 17 '10 at 16:09
2  
Creating this User from a consoleapp works fine for me. –  Marijn Nov 17 '10 at 16:14
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My guess is you are initializing Creator somehow which is causing an infinite number of User's to be created leading to a StackoverflowException.

Here's an example which produces just that:

public List<User> CreatUsers()
{
    List<User> users = new List<User>;

    //Some DB call to get a list of users
    foreach (var record in userlist)
        List.Add(CreatUser(record));
}

public User CreateUser(?? record)
{
    User user = new User();
    //Set properties
    if (record has creator) //pseudo-code
        user.Creator = CreatUser(record.Creator); //guessing as to record.Creator
}

public class User
{
    public User()
    {
        UserName = "";          //Stackoverflow on this line.
        EmailAddress = "";
    }

    public String UserName { get; set; }
    public String EmailAddress { get; set; }

    public User Creator { get; set; }
}
//{Cannot evaluate expression because the current thread is in a stack overflow state.}

Actually, I have no idea how to fix it because it's too hard to guess at all his code, lol.

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+1 I think that's very likely the OP problem –  digEmAll Nov 17 '10 at 16:32
    
Well, apparently he answered his own question stating he was doing some loop when creating Users who were their own creators. At first I couldn't think of why that would be an issue because user.Creator = user; shouldn't be an issue, but now I can see him creating another instance of that SAME user to set it to the creator, which he does over and over again instead of using that same User object. So his issue was in code he did not post. lol. –  m-y Nov 17 '10 at 16:40
    
Oh, and my guess was right on, except I'm guessing his Creator = new User() is not within the constructor, but rather in his data loop to create users. I'm gonna update my post to show how he probably did it and how he should probably fix it. –  m-y Nov 17 '10 at 16:42
    
I take it back, no code = no fix offered. ;) –  m-y Nov 17 '10 at 16:52
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I will bet money your UserName Setter looks like this

public string UserName
{
    get { return UserName; }
    set { UserName = value; }
}

This is causing the infinate recursion. You need to either design it like the Creator property you had, or do this

private string _UserName;
public string UserName
{
    get { return _UserName; }
    set { _UserName = value; }
}

EDIT:

I doubt the Creator property has anything to do with the issue because that value will just be null in the constructor

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already tried that and it doesnt work –  rushonerok Nov 17 '10 at 16:11
    
This does introduce an SO exception. But in the property setter and not on UserName = "" in the constructor, as stated in the question. –  Marijn Nov 17 '10 at 16:16
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I have a user where the creator is itself. I guess it was a data problem not a code problem. Thanks for looking at this anyways.

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1  
I'd still say that's a code problem. The code should be defensive and handle such a data problem gracefully. –  Richard Fawcett Nov 17 '10 at 16:27
    
I don't see why that would cause a Stackoverflow though. I can do the following no problem. User user = new User(); user.Creator = user; –  m-y Nov 17 '10 at 16:27
    
@Richard I agree. I am adding some additional checks so that the recursion stops if this is the case. –  rushonerok Nov 17 '10 at 16:30
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