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Is there any way to serialize a property with an internal setter in C#?
I understand that this might be problematic - but if there is a way - I would like to know.

Example:

[Serializable]
public class Person
{
    public int ID { get; internal set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

Code that serializes an instance of the class Person:

Person person = new Person();
person.Age = 27;
person.Name = "Patrik";
person.ID = 1;

XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Person));
TextWriter writer = new StreamWriter(@"c:\test.xml");
serializer.Serialize(writer, person);
writer.Close();

Result (missing the ID property):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Person xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
        xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <Name>Patrik</Name>
  <Age>27</Age>
</Person>
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6 Answers 6

up vote 42 down vote accepted

If it is an option, DataContractSerializer (.NET 3.0) can serialize non-public properties:

[DataContract]
public class Person
{
    [DataMember]
    public int ID { get; internal set; }
    [DataMember]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [DataMember]
    public int Age { get; set; }
}
...
static void Main()
{
    Person person = new Person();
    person.Age = 27;
    person.Name = "Patrik";
    person.ID = 1;

    DataContractSerializer serializer = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(Person));
    XmlWriter writer = XmlWriter.Create(@"c:\test.xml");
    serializer.WriteObject(writer, person);
    writer.Close();
}

With the xml (re-formatted):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Person xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
        xmlns="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/">
    <Age>27</Age>
    <ID>1</ID>
    <Name>Patrik</Name>
</Person>
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1  
I wish I could upvote this twice –  Andrew Hare Jan 7 '09 at 15:29
    
^^ Me too. This is awesome! –  John Chapman May 17 '13 at 19:48

I think that the only alternative one way is to implement IXmlSerializable and do the object xml writing / parsing yourself.

Edit: After reading the comments, DataContractSerializer looks interesting ;)

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1  
Or use DataContractSerializer –  Marc Gravell Jan 7 '09 at 15:27
    
I agree with Marc - please look at DataContractSerializer first as it will save you many headaches. –  Andrew Hare Jan 7 '09 at 15:28

If you're doing "default" XML serialization it will only look at public properties. Implementing IXmlSerializable will get you control over exactly what is serialized. If you're doing "standard" .NET serialization, it will look at fields - not properties, so your object will still be correctly serialized without any need for implementing any extra interfaces.

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By "standard" I assume you mean "BinaryFormatter"; in most ways, this is less standard, since xml serialization is supported on all the frameworks (CF, Silverlight, etc) - but BinaryFormatter isn't. Xml serialization is also more portable; or there are also 3rd-party portable binary serializers. –  Marc Gravell Jan 7 '09 at 15:32
    
By "standard", I mean based on the standard .NET interfaces such as IFormatter. There is no reason an XML-based formatter cannot be used. Indeed, that's what SoapFormatter is. –  Kent Boogaart Jan 7 '09 at 15:46

Not that I've found without doing some work. I believe this is because the XmlSerializer that is generated uses reflection to generate a new class (which is in a new assembly, so cannot see internal member/methods).

There may be some mileage in using an XmlSerialization PreCompilier to generate the code, and then to modify it into an internal class for your purposes, so you'd then do something like:

XmlSerializer serializer = new MyPersonXmlSerializer();

The other option (and probably preferable) is to implement IXmlSerializable which will guide the auto-generated code to do the right thing.

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You can implement IXmlSerializable, unfortunately this negates the most important benefit of XmlSerializer (the ability to declaratively control serialization). DataContractSerializer (xml based) and BinaryFormatter (binary based) could be used as alternatives to XmlSerializer each having its pros and cons.

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It certainly is possible. I want to illustrate a solution using XElement, one that I've grown quite fond of by the way. You do not need to use the XmlSerializer or the DataContractSerializer or any class or property annotations like [DataContract] or [Serializable] for that matter, if you do not wish to do so. Also, the example below shows how You can interchange private set with internal set in my example, by the way:

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Xml.Linq;

namespace SerializationTesting
{

    class Person
    {

        // Notice how this object type uses private setters, something that the traditional XmlSerializer will complain about if you don't use a wrapper class..
        public string Name { get; private set; }
        public DateTime Birthday { get; private set; }
        public long HeightInMillimeters { get; private set; }
        public Gender Gendrality { get; private set; }

        // Generate a serialized XElement from this Person object.
        public XElement ToXElement()
        {
            return new XElement("person",
                new XAttribute("name", Name),
                new XAttribute("birthday", Birthday),
                new XAttribute("heightInMillimeters", HeightInMillimeters),
                new XAttribute("gendrality", (long)Gendrality)
            );
        }

        // Serialize this Person object to an XElement.
        public static Person FromXElement(XElement x)
        {
            return new Person(
                (string)x.Attribute("name"),
                (DateTime)x.Attribute("birthday"),
                (long)x.Attribute("heightInMillimeters"),
                (Gender)(long)x.Attribute("gendrality")
            );
        }

        public Person(string name, DateTime birthday, long heightInMillimeters, Gender gender)
        {
            Name = name;
            Birthday = birthday;
            HeightInMillimeters = heightInMillimeters;
            Gendrality = gender;
        }

        // You must override this in conjunction with overriding GetHashCode (below) if you want .NET collections (HashSet, List, etc.) to properly compare Person objects.
        public override bool Equals(object obj)
        {
            if (obj.GetType() == typeof(Person))
            {
                Person objAsPerson = (Person)obj;
                return Name == objAsPerson.Name && Birthday == objAsPerson.Birthday && HeightInMillimeters == objAsPerson.HeightInMillimeters && Gendrality == objAsPerson.Gendrality;
            }
            return false;
        }

        // You must override this in conjunction with overriding Equals (above) if you want .NET collections (HashSet, List, etc.) to properly compare Person objects.
        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return Name.GetHashCode() ^ Birthday.GetHashCode() ^ HeightInMillimeters.GetHashCode() ^ Gendrality.GetHashCode();
        }

        // This allows us to compare Person objects using the == operator.
        public static bool operator ==(Person a, Person b)
        {
            return a.Equals(b);
        }

        // This allows us to compate Person objects using the != operator.
        public static bool operator !=(Person a, Person b)
        {
            return !a.Equals(b);
        }
    }

    public enum Gender
    {
        Male,
        Female
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // Create first person (note how UTC time saves and loads properly when casting).
            Person personOne = new Person("Alexandru", DateTime.UtcNow, 1000, Gender.Male);
            // Save the first person to a local file on the hard disk.
            personOne.ToXElement().Save("PersonOne.dat");
            // Create second person (not using UTC time this time around).
            Person personTwo = new Person("Alexandria", DateTime.Now, 900, Gender.Female);
            // Save the second person to a local file on the hard disk.
            personTwo.ToXElement().Save("PersonTwo.dat");
            // Load the first person from a local file on the hard disk.
            XDocument personOneDocument = XDocument.Load("PersonOne.dat");
            Person personOneLoadedFromDocument = Person.FromXElement(personOneDocument.Elements().First());
            // Load the second person from a local file on the hard disk.
            XDocument personTwoDocument = XDocument.Load("PersonTwo.dat");
            Person personTwoLoadedFromDocument = Person.FromXElement(personTwoDocument.Elements().First());
            // Serialize the first person to a string and then load them from that string.
            string personOneString = personOne.ToXElement().ToString();
            XDocument personOneDocumentFromString = XDocument.Parse(personOneString);
            Person personOneLoadedFromDocumentFromString = Person.FromXElement(personOneDocumentFromString.Elements().First());
            // Check for equalities between persons (all outputs will be "true").
            Console.WriteLine(personOne.Equals(personOneLoadedFromDocument));
            Console.WriteLine(personTwo.Equals(personTwoLoadedFromDocument));
            Console.WriteLine(personOne == personOneLoadedFromDocument);
            Console.WriteLine(personTwo == personTwoLoadedFromDocument);
            Console.WriteLine(personOne != personTwo);
            Console.WriteLine(personOneLoadedFromDocument != personTwoLoadedFromDocument);
            Console.WriteLine(personOne.Equals(personOneLoadedFromDocumentFromString));
            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

The output of all of the equality checks in the console application above will be true, as expected. This does not suffer from annoyances like having to keep track of encodings or the way you parse data because it does all of that for you, and it does not limit your class to public setters like the XmlSerializer does.

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