Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In need to know how to traverse an stl map. I don't want to use its key. I don't care about the ordering, just a way to access all elements it contains. Is there a way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
refer to: cplusplus.com/reference/stl/map/begin –  Nim Nov 17 '10 at 17:37
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Sure. This is the basic method used to traverse Standard Library collection:

C++03/C++11:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <map>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    typedef map<int,string> MyMap;
    MyMap my_map;
    // ... magic

    for( MyMap::const_iterator it = my_map.begin(); it != my_map.end(); ++it )
    {
      int key = it->first;
      string value = it->second;
    }
}

If you need to modify the elements, use iterator rather than const_iterator, and instead of copying the values out of the iterator, get a reference and modify the values through that:

for( MyMap::iterator it = my_map.begin(); it != my_map.end(); ++it )
{
  int key = it->first;
  string& value = it->second;
  if( value == "foo" )
    value = "bar";
}

This is how you typically traverse containers by hand. The big difference is that for a map the type of *it is a pair rather than the element itself

C++11

If you have the benefit of a C++11 compiler (for example, latest GCC with --std=c++11 or MSVC), then you have other options as well.

First you can make use of the auto keyword to get rid of all that nasty verbosity:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <map>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    map<int,string> my_map;
    // ... magic

    for( auto it = my_map.begin(); it != my_map.end(); ++it )
    {
      int key = it->first;
      string& value = it->second;
    }
}

Second, you can also employ lambdas. In conjunction with decltype, this might result in cleaner code (though with tradeoffs):

#include <cstdlib>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    map<int,string> my_map;
    // ... magic

    for_each(my_map.begin(), my_map.end(), [](decltype(*my_map.begin()) val)
    {
        string& value = val.second;
        int key = val.first;
    });
}

C++11 also instroduces the concept of a range-bases for loop, which you may recognize as similar to other languages. However, some compilers do not fully support this yet -- notably, MSVC.

#include <cstdlib>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    map<int,string> my_map;
    // ... magic

    for(auto val : my_map )
    {
        string& value = val.second;
        int key = val.first;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In the latest version of C++ standard you can replace the lengthy iterator decelerations with the auto keyword. –  ROAR Nov 17 '10 at 17:47
    
@RA: Or even better, a range based for loop. g++ 4.6.0 already supports this. –  FredOverflow Nov 17 '10 at 17:50
    
Agreed, I'll edit again with more info –  John Dibling Nov 17 '10 at 17:54
    
@RA: strictly speaking, in the latest proposal for the next version of the C++ standard, you can do that thing you said. –  Steve Jessop Nov 17 '10 at 18:02
1  
You keep copying the value out of the iterator. You should use a references as this then allows manipulation of the data within the map. string& value = val.second; I think any (average) user manipulating the value would expect the internal representation of the map to change. –  Loki Astari Nov 17 '10 at 21:33
show 5 more comments

As with any STL container, the begin() and end() methods return iterators that you can use to iterate over the map. Dereferencing a map iterator yields a std::pair<const Key, Value>.

share|improve this answer
    
This is wrong, not all STL container iterators yield std::pair. There is no need for a pair in vector or list for example. –  EddieV223 Oct 6 '12 at 1:59
    
@EddieV223 fair enough, I clarified my answer. –  FredOverflow Oct 6 '12 at 6:34
    
changed by down to an up vote. –  EddieV223 Oct 6 '12 at 14:45
add comment

You can traverse STL map in the same way as any other STL container: using iterators, e.g.

for (std::map<key, value>::const_iterator
     i = myMap.begin(), end = myMap.end(); i != end; ++i)
{
    // *i is a key-value pair
}
share|improve this answer
    
I do wonder: in generally, does a compiler automatically lifts the myMap.end() outside of the loop ? Lifting invariants is a common optimization but I do wonder if it gets detected, I suppose it could with the implementation being inlined, but I don't know. Thoughts ? –  Matthieu M. Nov 17 '10 at 17:47
    
@Matthieu: main thought is that myMap.end() is almost certainly a trivial operation. Barely worth lifting, especially considering that iterating a map isn't a very cache-friendly operation. –  Steve Jessop Nov 17 '10 at 18:04
    
@Matthieu: after some header-diving: in the GNU implementation, an iterator holds a pointer to a node, and the "end node" of a map is embedded in the object. So I think that assuming several layers of calls can be inlined, constructing and returning an end iterator is basically a pointer copy, and if you're lucky i != myMap.end() could just be a compare of the address stored in i, with myMap+offset. I haven't disassembled any code to check, though. –  Steve Jessop Nov 17 '10 at 18:17
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.