Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to learn c++ on my own and I've hit a bit of a road block. The problem is I need to take an integer,split it into its digits and get the sum of the digits and display them.

Example:

input number: 123456
digits in the integer: 1 2 3 4 5 6
sum: 21

I have it all done, but when I rip the integer, into digits I can't display it correctly. It displays in reverse order.

So in the program below I enter 1234 and it spits out 4 3 2 1. I know why, I just don't know how to fix it.

Here is my code so far:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

int countDigitsInInteger(int n)
{
    int count =0;
    while(n>0)
    {
       count++;
       n=n/10;
    }
    return count;
}

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{  
    int intLength =0;
    int number;
    int digit;      
    int sum = 0;
    string s;    
    cout << "Please enter an integer ";
    cin >>number;
    cout << "Orginal Number = "<<number <<endl;
    //make the number positive
    if (number<0)
    number = -number;    
    intLength = countDigitsInInteger(number);
    //break apart the integer into digits
    while(number>0)
    {                         
        digit = number % 10;
        number = number / 10;        
        cout <<digit << " "; 
        sum = sum+digit; 
    } 
    cout <<endl <<"Sum of the digits is: "<<sum<<endl;
    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Here is my solution

can't see :)

share|improve this question
    
All your suggestions are much appreciated! I am very new to c++ and programming in general. It will take me some time to understand exactly what you are trying to do with each suggestion. Sorry about the indentation, in my program it wasn't that bad but when I copied it into this site it went crappy –  nkuebelbeck Nov 17 '10 at 19:02
    
is this scheduled homework for a class you are in, or a project of your own as self-improvement? –  Steve Townsend Nov 17 '10 at 19:45
    
what happens if you put in a negative number? –  Nim Nov 17 '10 at 19:50
    
well, I figured it out with my limited knowledge. Couldn't wrap my head around what was posted here. –  nkuebelbeck Nov 17 '10 at 22:56
    
never looks right when I bring it into stackoverflow –  nkuebelbeck Nov 17 '10 at 23:01

11 Answers 11

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your problem comes from the fact that you are reading the digits backwards, thus you need to print them out backwards. A stack will help you tremendously.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>
#include <stack>

int countDigitsInInteger(int n)
{
    int count =0;
    while(n>0)
    {
        count++;
        n=n/10;
    }
    return count;
}

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{  
    int intLength =0;
    int number;
    int digit;      
    int sum = 0;
    string s;    
    cout << "Please enter an integer ";
    cin >>number;
    cout << "Orginal Number = "<<number <<endl;
    //make the number positive
    if (number<0)
        number = -number;    

    intLength = countDigitsInInteger(number);
    //break apart the integer into digits

    stack<int> digitstack;
    while(number>0)
    {                         
        digit = number % 10;
        number = number / 10;
        digitstack.push(digit);
        sum = sum+digit; 
    }

    while(digitstack.size() > 0)
    {
        cout << digitstack.top() << " ";
        digitstack.pop();
    }

    cout <<endl <<"Sum of the digits is: "<<sum<<endl;
    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Oh, and BTW, keep your indentation clean. Its important.

EDIT: In response to Steve Townsend, this method is not necessarily overkill, it is just different from yours. The code can be slimmed down so that it seems less like overkill:

#include <iostream>
#include <stack>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int getInput(string prompt)
{
    int val;
    cout << prompt;
    cin >> val;
    return val < 0 ? -val : val;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int num = getInput("Enter a number: ");
    cout << "Original Number: " << num << endl;

    stack<int> digits;
    int sum = 0;
    while(num > 0)
    {
        digits.push(num % 10);
        sum += digits.top();
        num = num / 10;
    }

    while(digits.size() > 0)
    {
        cout << digits.top() << " ";
        digits.pop();
    }

    cout << endl << "Sum of digits is " << sum << endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Seems harder than it should be. Maybe its just me. –  nkuebelbeck Nov 17 '10 at 19:14
1  
@nkuebelbeck, stacks are actually fundamental data structures. Don't hesitate to learn them and feel comfortable using them. –  Stargazer712 Nov 17 '10 at 20:11
    
In this case you can use recursion to implement the stack. print(int number) { if (number > 10) print(number / 10); cout << (number % 10); } –  helios Jan 13 '11 at 9:19

Stack and recursion is overkill for this problem. Just store each digit into a string and then reverse it before output. You need to work out how to call reverse with the string members for this to work. for_each can be used to output each element of the string.

For extra credit (by virtue of conciseness and expressiveness), insert the number directly into an ostringstream and use that as the basis for your reversible string.

My stringstream version of this code is 5 lines long. Logic is:

  • declare stringstream
  • declare int with value
  • output int to stringstream
  • create string from stringstream
  • output the result digit by digit using for_each.

You can sum the digits using accumulate on the string, provide you account for the fact that int('1') != 1. That's an extra two lines, to sum the digits and output the result.

The point is not that doing this via stack or recursion is BAD, it's just that once you get more familiar with the STL there are typically more elegant ways to do a job than the obvious. Implementing this using stack, recursion and any other ways you can think of makes a simple homework into a great real-world learning experience.

Here's the accumulate code to sum the members of a string consisting of decimal digits, for example:

#include <string>
#include <numeric>

std::string intString("654321");
int sum = accumulate(intString.begin(), intString.end(), 0) - 
    (intString.size() * int('0'));

EDIT: here's the full code, for comparative purposes:

ostringstream intStream;
int value(123456);

intStream << value;

string intString(intStream.str());
for_each(intString.begin(), intString.end(), [] (char c) { cout << c << endl; });

int sum = accumulate(intString.begin(), intString.end(), 0) - 
        (intString.size() * int('0'));
cout << "Sum is " << sum << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't call it overkill, I would just say that the two methods are different. There's nothing wrong with either solution. –  Stargazer712 Nov 17 '10 at 20:25
    
@Stargazer712 - I did not mean that to be inflammatory. I think the alternative answers, in this context, are actually more suitable as early-stage C++ homework solutions. In the real world, I would not think of using a stack or recursion for simple string manipulation, though. –  Steve Townsend Nov 17 '10 at 20:34
    
I will ask the question I asked the OP, what about negative numbers? ;) –  Nim Nov 17 '10 at 23:20
    
@Nim - since the problem involves working with "the digits in an integer" I would enforce digits only using unsigned int as a target for data from cin. You could equally ask what about any other malformed input. –  Steve Townsend Nov 18 '10 at 2:07

Let's not forget the stringstream approach, which I also find elegant.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{
    int num = 123456789;
    std::cout << "Number: " << num << std::endl;

    std::stringstream tmp_stream;
    tmp_stream << num;
    std::cout << "As string: " << tmp_stream.str() << std::endl;

    std::cout << "Total digits: " << tmp_stream.str().size() << std::endl;


    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < tmp_stream.str().size(); i++)
    {
        std::cout << "Digit [" << i << "] is: " << tmp_stream.str().at(i) << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Outputs:

Number: 123456789
As string: 123456789
Total digits: 9
Digit [0] is: 1
Digit [1] is: 2
Digit [2] is: 3
Digit [3] is: 4
Digit [4] is: 5
Digit [5] is: 6
Digit [6] is: 7
Digit [7] is: 8
Digit [8] is: 9
share|improve this answer

Push the digits onto a stack.

After you've gotten all the digits,

 sum = 0 ;
 while( stack not empty ) {
   pop the stack to get a digit
   sum += digit
   display digit
 }
 display sum

You need a stack, you say? Use the STL's stack: std::stack<int>

share|improve this answer
digit = number % 10;

This operation will return the the right most number.

so when you try to your app with an input "1357", on the first run through the while loop, it will return 7. Next it will return 5, and so on.

If all you want is the sum of the individual digits, then the order you get them (and print them out) will not affect the final answer. If you still want them to printed in the correct order, you can store the digits in an array (or Vector or Stack, as others have mentioned), reverse the contents, and then loop through the structure, to print out its contents.

share|improve this answer
    
or not reverse it and simply loop backwards :) –  Matthieu M. Nov 18 '10 at 7:27

Use std::stack to store separate digits, then print out the contents of stack.

here is a nice article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stack_(data_structure)

here is how to use stacks in C++: http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/stack.html

share|improve this answer

You're going to have to store them and print them out in reverse order, or else do some recursion and print out after the recursive call.

int printdigits(int number)
{
   if (number == 0)
      return 0;

   int digit = number % 10;
   int sum = printdigits(number / 10);
   cout <<digit << " "; 
   return sum+digit; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
How do I print them out in reverse order? –  nkuebelbeck Nov 17 '10 at 19:12
    
@nkuebelbeck: I mean that you'll have to print them in the opposite order that you retreive them. Either store them on a stack until you've retrieved them all, and then print them in whatever order you want, or if you use a recursive method like I've written out, the reversing happens automatically, based on where the cout statement is placed. –  Eclipse Nov 17 '10 at 19:28

Your indention is hideous. That said, the reason your digits are coming out in reverse order is pretty simple: you're getting the digits in reverse order. Think about it: you're taking a remainder of the number divided by ten, then printing the remainder. Then you divide the number by 10... and so on. You should store the digits in an array, then print the array in reverse order.

And learn to indent.

share|improve this answer

Being a sum does not really matter the order, but the logic you are using splits it from the least significant digit to the most significant ( and is the easiest way).

share|improve this answer

I will put an example up in good faith that you will not reproduce it, if this is a homework assignment, use it as a chance to learn...

// reference: www.cplusplus.com
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <numeric>

using namespace std;

// What does this do?
template <typename T>
struct gen
{
  gen(T start) : _num(start) {}
  // Do we need these? But why have I commented them out?
  //gen(gen const& copy) : _num(copy._num) {}
  //gen& operator=(gen const& copy) { _num = copy._num; }
  //~gen() {}

  // Why do we do this?
  T operator()() { T digit = _num % 10; _num /= 10; return digit; }

  T _num;
};

// How is this different to the above?
template <typename T>
bool check_non_zero (T i) 
{
  return i != 0;
}

// And this? what's going on here with the parameter v?
template <typename T, int _size>
T sum_of_digits(T value, std::vector<T>& v)
{
  // Why would we do this?
  if (value == 0)
  {
    v.push_back(0);
    return 0;
  }
  // What is the purpose of this?
  v.resize(_size);
  // What is this called?
  gen<T> gen_v(value);
  // generate_n? What is this beast? what does v.begin() return? where did _size come from?
  generate_n(v.begin(), _size, gen_v);
  // reverse? what does this do?
  reverse(v.begin(), v.end());
  // erase? find_if? what do they do? what the heck is check_non_zero<T>?
  v.erase(v.begin(), find_if(v.begin(), v.end(), check_non_zero<T>));

  // what the heck is accumulate? 
  return accumulate(v.begin(), v.end(), 0);
}

int main()
{
  // What does this do?
  vector<int> v;
  // What is this peculiar syntax? NOTE: 10 here is because the largest possible number of int has 10 digits
  int sum = sum_of_digits<int, 10>(123, v); 

  cout << "digits: ";
  // what does copy do? and what the heck is ostream_iterator?
  copy(v.begin(), v.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout, " "));
  cout << endl;
  cout << "sum: " << sum << endl;

  // other things to consider, what happens if the number is negative?
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
too noobish to even read that :) –  nkuebelbeck Nov 17 '10 at 23:08
    
but hopefully it's piqued your curiosity and the comments will give you things to think about as you learn this weird and wonderful language called C++... :) –  Nim Nov 17 '10 at 23:23

I used this for input for 5 numbers

int main () {

using namespace std;

int number;`

cout << "Enter your digit: ";
cin >> number;
if (number == 0)
  return 0;

int a = number % 10;
int second = (number / 10);

int b = second % 10;
int third = (second / 10);

int c = third % 10;
int fourth = (third / 10);

int d = fourth % 10;
int fifth = (fourth / 10);

int e = fifth % 10;

cout << e << " " << d << " " << c << " " << b << " " << a << endl;

return 0;

}

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.