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I'd like to have something in my settings like

if ip in DEV_IPS:
   SOMESETTING = 'foo'
else:
   SOMESETTING = 'bar'

Is there an easy way to get the ip or hostname - also - is this is a bad idea ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted
import socket
socket.gethostbyname(socket.gethostname())

However, I'd recommend against this and instead maintain multiple settings file for each environment you're working with.

settings/__init__.py
settings/qa.py 
settings/production.py

__init__.py has all of your defaults. At the top of qa.py, and any other settings file, the first line has:

from settings import *

followed by any overrides needed for that particular environment.

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Damn, was just about to post this answer. :( And I agree that using multiple settings file is probably a better idea. –  Jordan Reiter Nov 17 '10 at 18:54
2  
you can use "export DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE=settings.qa" in bash to pick which settings file to use –  Spike Gronim Nov 17 '10 at 20:06
    
OK, thinking about it having multiple settings has got to be a better idea, but this answers the (misguided?) question I asked so this one will get the tick. –  Stuart Axon Nov 19 '10 at 11:12

One method some shops use is to have an environment variable set on each machine. Maybe called "environment". In POSIX systems you can do something like ENVIRONMENT=production in the user's .profile file (this will be slightly different for each shell and OS). Then in settings.py you can do something like this:

import os

if os.environ['ENVIRONMENT'] == 'production':
    # Production
    DATABASE_ENGINE = 'mysql'
    DATABASE_NAME = ....
else:
    # Development
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