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The javascript, when run through JSLint yells at me and I am not sure why.

/*jslint browser: true, devel: true, evil: true, undef: true, nomen: true, eqeqeq: true, plusplus: true, bitwise: true, newcap: true, immed: true */

var foo = function() {
  try {
    console.log('foo');
  } catch(e) {
    alert(e);
  }

  try {
    console.log('bar');
  } catch(e) {
    alert(e);
  }
};

foo();

It tells me:

Problem at line 12 character 11: 'e' is already defined.

} catch(e) {

It appears to be upset that I have a second catch(e). Why would this be an issue? Does it not simply set e to local variable inside the catch block? Do I need to uniquely name the local variables for all trapped errors in a function?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

To JSLint, try..catch has the implicit effect of declaring e as a local variable. Because you have two such blocks within the same function (there is no block scope in JavaScript), JSLint sees that as declaring a variable that has already been declared.

Naming the variables e1, e2, etc. would prevent this warning from JSLint. Is it really a problem though? The ECMAScript 5 specification, section 12.14, says "No matter how control leaves the Block the LexicalEnvironment is always restored to its former state." This, in fact, does appear to be the case:

try {
    throw new Error("testing 1234");
} catch(fooBarBaz){
    alert("Catch: " + fooBarBaz);    // works
}

alert(fooBarBaz);    // throws exception

So, to conclude, this is simply a limitation of JSLint and is unlikely to lead to any practical problem.

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It appears you are correct. I guess that try/catch does not introduce scope, as proved by this quick test I put up: jsfiddle.net/VRcwV –  Alex Wayne Nov 17 '10 at 22:05
    
Oh just saw the edit! So it does not introduce scope, but the local variable created by the catch statement is not available outside that catch. So it does introduce a tiny bit of specialized scope just for that exception? –  Alex Wayne Nov 17 '10 at 22:09
1  
@Squeegy: IE 8 is not compliant, it seems. Try my test (jsfiddle.net/DpHMt) in that browser, and you will see both alert boxes open. –  PleaseStand Nov 17 '10 at 22:22

Try to use a different variable, maybe its getting confused because e is usually reserved for event handlers.

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as far as I know e is not reserved. –  pex Nov 17 '10 at 21:45

The JSLint I use shows no error at all - and logical your code is correct.

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Use a different variable for each try / catch.

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JSLint might simply be wrong here. According to the ECMAScript spec, entering a catch block creates a new scope inside which the exception variable is defined. In your example, e is valid only inside the catch block and is not defined outside. There is no redefinition here.

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1  
ECMAScipt spec, sure. But browser implementation, apparently not: jsfiddle.net/VRcwV –  Alex Wayne Nov 17 '10 at 22:03
    
@Squeegy: It's only the exception variable e that goes into the new scope. Variables declared with var are always at function scope. Try alert(e) and you'll see that it's undefined outside the catch block. –  casablanca Nov 17 '10 at 22:09

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