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A friend of mine wants me to convert his code into a doubly linked list, though I'm not familiar with it at all. I've looked up doubly linked lists but I can't tell by his code what to do with it. I'm not a master programmer. Do you have any suggestions?

import java.util.Collection;

import java.util.List;


class SinglyLinkedList<E> implements List<E> {



private class SinglyLinkedListNode<T> {



    T data;

    SinglyLinkedListNode<T> next;



    public SinglyLinkedListNode() {

        this(null, null);

    }



    public SinglyLinkedListNode(T data) {

        this(data, null);

    }



    public SinglyLinkedListNode(T d, SinglyLinkedListNode<T> n) {

        data = d;

        next = n;

    }



    public boolean equals(Object o) {

        if (data != null && o != null) {

            return data.equals(((SinglyLinkedListNode) o).data);

        } else {

            return (data == null && o == null);

        }

    }

}

private SinglyLinkedListNode<E> list, last;

private int size;



public SinglyLinkedList() {

    clear();

}



public void clear() {

    list = last = null;

    size = 0;

}



public boolean contains(Object o) {

    SinglyLinkedListNode<E> t = list;

    while (t != null) {

        if (t.data == null) {

            if (o == null) {

                return true;

            }

        } else if (t.data.equals(o)) {

            return true;

        }

        t = t.next;

    }

    return false;

}



public boolean add(E e) {

    SinglyLinkedListNode<E> n = new SinglyLinkedListNode<E>(e);

    if (isEmpty()) {

        list = last = n;

    } else {

        last = last.next = n;

    }

    size++;

    return true;

}



public void add(int index, E e) {

    int currSize = size();

    if (index < 0 || index > currSize) {

        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException(

                "Index: " + index + ", Size: " + size());

    }

    if (isEmpty()) // index must == 0

    {

        list = last = new SinglyLinkedListNode<E>(e);

    } else {

        if (index == 0) {

            list = new SinglyLinkedListNode<E>(e, list);

        } else {

            SinglyLinkedListNode<E> n = list;

            for (int i = 0; i < index - 1; i++) {

                n = n.next;

            }

            n.next = new SinglyLinkedListNode<E>(e, n.next);

            if (index == currSize) {

                last = n.next;

            }

        }

    }

    size++;

}



public boolean equals(SinglyLinkedList<E> e) {


   SinglyLinkedListNode<E> e1 = list, e2 = e.list;

    try {

        for (int i = 1; i <= size(); i++) {

            if (!e1.equals(e2)) {

                return false;

            }

            e1 = e1.next;

            e2 = e2.next;

        }

    } catch (NullPointerException ex) {

        return false;

    }

    return true;

}



public E get(int index) {

    if (index < 0 || index >= size()) {

        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException(

                "Index: " + index + ", Size: " + size());

    }

    SinglyLinkedListNode<E> n = list;

    int i = 0;

    for (; i < index; i++) {

        n = n.next;

    }

    return n.data;

}



@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")

public int indexOf(Object o) {

    SinglyLinkedListNode<E> n = list;

    int i = 0;

    while (n != null) {

        if ((o == null

                ? (n.data == null)

                : (((E) o).equals(n.data)))) {

            return i;

        }

        n = n.next;

        i++;

    }

    return -1;

}



public boolean isEmpty() {

    return list == null;

}



public E remove(int index) {

    if (index < 0 || index >= size()) {

        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException(

                "Index: " + index + ", Size: " + size());

    }

    SinglyLinkedListNode<E> n = list, prevNode = null;

    int i = 0;

    while (true) {

        if (index == i) {

            if (n == list) // removing first node

            {

                list = list.next;

            } else {

                prevNode.next = n.next;

            }

            if (n == last) {

                last = prevNode;

            }

            size--;

            return n.data;

        }

        prevNode = n;

        n = n.next;

        i++;

    }

}



@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")

public boolean remove(Object o) {

    SinglyLinkedListNode<E> n = list, prevNode = null;

    while (n != null) {

        if ((o == null

                ? (n.data == null)

                : (((E) o).equals(n.data)))) {

            if (n == list) //removing first node

            {

                list = list.next;

            } else {

                prevNode.next = n.next;

            }

            if (n == last) {

                last = prevNode;

            }

            size--;

            return true;

        }

        prevNode = n;

        n = n.next;

    }

    return false;

}



public int size() {

    return size;

}



public String toString() {

    String s = "((";

    SinglyLinkedListNode<E> t = list;

    if (t != null) {

        while (t.next != null) {

            s += t.data + ", ";

            t = t.next;

        }

        s += last.data;

    }

    return s + "))";

}
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14  
Is your friend your CS teacher? –  shoebox639 Nov 17 '10 at 19:59
5  
Is this homework? Why can't your "friend" post this question herself? –  MAK Nov 17 '10 at 20:01
    
@shoebox639 I wish I can upvote you again –  John Vint Nov 17 '10 at 20:12
    
Unrelated to the main question, but you should use StringBuffer if you're going to repeatedly concatenate to a character string. The String data type is immutable, and every time you use the + or += operators you generate a new string in memory (and the JVM has to garbage-collect the old one). Not good practice. :-) –  Platinum Azure Nov 17 '10 at 20:14
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't understand the problem. If this is homework, you should say so -- community rules! A quick explanation, regardless:

A linked list is a structure with the following,... well, structure:

DATA                      |--> DATA
REFERENCE TO NEXT ITEM ---|    REFERENCE TO NEXT ITEM ---...

Each "link" in the "chain" contains some data, and a way to locate the next item in the chain. That's a singly linked list, as you said.

A doubly linked list is a very similar structure, only each link in the chain contains both a way of locating the next item, and a way of locating the previous item. If you need to be able to walk the list both ways, you'll need this kind of structure.

|-> DATA                      |--> DATA
|   REFERENCE TO NEXT ITEM ---|    REFERENCE TO NEXT ITEM ---...
---------------------------------- REFERENCE TO PREV ITEM

Ooookay the "drawings" are hideous. You can look up what a doubly linked list is with a Google query and get better information, on second thought, but oh well.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, apparently the homework tag is now discouraged officially (at least that's what someone told me). The official recommendation is to openly admit that it's homework, but to avoid 'meta' tags (that have nothing to do with the content of the question). –  Christopher Pfohl Nov 17 '10 at 20:05
    
Oh, look at that! Edited, thanks. Good to know. –  uʍop ǝpısdn Nov 17 '10 at 20:09
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Take a look at this other question on SO. It should help you to better understand the doubly linked list.

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Each node needs a next as well as a previous placeholder for it to be a doubly linked list.

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LinkedList in Java is a doubly-linked list. Why would you want to create one by yourself?

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sounds like homework. This will get you started.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doubly_linked_list

basically, in a singly linked list each node has a pointer to the next node. In a doubly linked list there are pointers to both next and previous. Beware how the pointers work at the beginning and the end of the list.

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