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is there anything?

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i am looking for a generic version. Any open source libs out there? –  CSharpDevLondon Jan 7 '09 at 16:05
    
I don't know of anything, but keep an eye on the parallel extensions for .Net. They have some concurrent collection classes, but no dictionary implementation yet. –  Michael Meadows Jan 7 '09 at 17:57
    
Could you explain what the ConcurrentHashMap does for those of us who aren't familiar with it? –  Drew Noakes Jan 7 '09 at 19:16

5 Answers 5

The basic idea of ConcurrentHashMap is that it is thread-safe WITHOUT the need for locks. So all the "use locks ideas" are basiclly as if you said "use Java".

Internally you use some CAS (compare-and-swap) operations and guarantee that no matter how the threads run some invariant always remains true. Since you do no mutual exclusion (the only atomic thing is the CAS operation in hardware), you completely avoid the possibility of deadlocks and usually there is some performance gain too. Of course the implementation of the data structure is (a lot) more complicated (that's why it's cool to have one ready or else it's a pain-in-the-ass to implement it or even prove it actually works with more threads).

I wish there was such a thing in the .NET framework too.

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me to, I wish it would have been such a thing in .NET –  Omu Dec 4 '09 at 11:48

There is a generic Dictionary class for implementing associative arrays (aka hashtables). Recently MS came out with the ConcurrentDictionary class: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd287191.aspx which is probably what you want. It's .Net 4+ though. :(

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Can you not surround access to the Hashtable (or other datastructure, probably a Generic one) with a ReaderWriterLock that allows single write / multiple reads and handles starvations issues etc?

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C# (Along with the rest of .NET) has a Hashtable... It's located in System.Collections. I'm not sure what a "Concurrent"HashMap in java is, but the Hashtable should be thread-safe when there's only one writer and an arbitrary number of readers... other than that, you have to manage the concurrency yourself.

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Is that sticktly true, if the writer does an add that causes the hashtable to rehash I wouldn't expect the readers' enumerator to be stable –  Oskar Jan 7 '09 at 16:08
    
I read that in MSDN once, though I haven't tested it myself. So I hope its true, but I haven't proved it. –  GWLlosa Jan 7 '09 at 19:00
    
MSDN: Hashtable is thread safe for use by multiple reader threads and a single writing thread. BUT: Enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread safe procedure. Even when a collection is synchronized, other threads can still modify the collection, which throws exception. –  GWLlosa Jan 7 '09 at 19:04

I'm not familiar with the ConcurrentHashMap you're talking about. Perhaps you could define what function it performs that you'd like to have in C# too.

If you just want to guarantee that a collection is thread-safe for concurrent access then you're best off defining your own lock strategy to control access to it.

The Hashtable.Synchronised(...) method seen in earlier versions of the .NET framework has been removed (along with the hiding of all ICollection.SyncRoot implementations via explicit implementations in System.Collections.Generic). This is because whenever you lock on a publicly accessible object, you're opening up the possibility for other callers to lock on your objects in ways that you can't control, and therefore deadlocks become possible.

Also, a 'synchronised' collection can only guarantee that calls to individual members are safe, however many scenarios involve 'transactions' including many members. Consider the following example:

if (collection.Contains(item))
    collection.Get(item);

The map object (whatever type it is) might guarantee that both the Contains and Get methods are thread-safe, but it can't guarantee that the item is still contained in the map by the time Get is called. Instead you should use code like this:

private readonly object _mapLock = new object();

public void Method()
{
    lock (_mapLock)
    {
        if (collection.Contains(item))
            collection.Get(item);
    }
}

@Oskar suggests using ReaderWriterLock. This class has a terrible implementation with worse performance than simple locking. If you're using newer versions of the framework, use ReaderWriterLockSlim instead.

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Just a performance note - the lock operation is very expensive, which is why you should perform a double check to avoid unnecessary locks: if (Contains...) lock(_mapLock) if (Contains...) Get... –  Allon Guralnek Aug 20 '09 at 6:53
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@Allon, 1) lock isn't quite as expensive as everyone makes out, but yet, there is a cost. 2) how do you know that Contains is thread-safe? If you don't call it while the collection is locked by your thread, another thread may modify it (perhaps performing an internal resize) and the results may be unpredictable. I prefer to always lock unless the documentation for the object in question makes it clear that a particular member is threadsafe for multiple readers and one writer (as some framework members do). –  Drew Noakes Aug 20 '09 at 12:28
    
Drew, since .Contains() is a read-only operation (does not modify shared state), the worst that could happen is that it returns an incorrect result (e.g. it couldn't corrupt the shared state). If it returns an erroneous false, then the operation will not be performed this go-around, and nothing undesirable happens. If the operation returns an erroneous true, the object is locked and then re-checked to prevent such false-positives. This is one of the two reasons for the seconds check (the other being to prevent a race condition). –  Allon Guralnek Aug 22 '09 at 11:28
    
Also, locks are very expensive – have a look at bit.ly/1uLKlD which actually does a simple benchmark. In his multithreaded test, using locks was 17 times slower (13081 ms verses 741 ms). I didn't invent the wheel here, quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-checked_locking - "The pattern is designed to reduce the overhead of acquiring a lock by first testing the locking criterion (the "lock hint") in an unsafe manner; only if that succeeds does the actual lock proceed." - notice the word unsafe. –  Allon Guralnek Aug 22 '09 at 11:29
    
@Allon, locks aren't that expensive. Of course, they do have a cost, but if implemented correctly, the shouldn't add too much extra processing time. Also software is part of two state solution, the other state being hardware. Bigger hardware negatates any locking and concurrency issues, unsless the software has badly written, in which case any number of profiler's would pick it early, allowing to re-writes for the next iterations or show up during prototyping. As regards the example, my timings are 7294ms for 100million locks and 572ms without locks. –  scope_creep Dec 31 '09 at 17:01

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