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i have simple interface that i want to test it out but i have'nt understood when to use URITemplate:

how would i access XMLData in this case...?

[OperationContract]
        [WebInvoke(Method = "GET",
            ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Xml,
            BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Wrapped)]
        string XMLData(string id);

 public class RestServiceImpl : IRestServiceImpl
    {    
        public string XMLData(string id)
        {
            return "my xml data:" + id;
        }
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

UriTemplate is some kind alike of masking your method. Example:

[WebInvoke(Method = "GET", ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Xml, BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Wrapped, UriTemplate = "myMethod/{id}")]  
string XMLData(string id);  

you may now call the method this way:

http://localhost/RestServiceImpl/myMethod/inputIdstring  

instead of...

http://localhost/RestServiceImpl/XMLData?id=inputIdstring  

I hope this helps..

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By default, if you don't specify a UriTemplate, WCF will supply one for you that uses a query string format, such as this:

XMLData?id={id}

However, you might want a RESTful URI, instead, like this:

xmldata/{id}  

For those cases, you add a UriTemplate. If you don't need anything but the default semantics, feel free to leave it off.

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if i use for RESTful URI for POST data than how would i do? –  Abu Hamzah Nov 17 '10 at 21:02
    
@Randolpho Please edit your your answer so I can take back my accidental down vote. –  Yiğit Yener Jul 16 '13 at 7:45
    
Um... ok. All edited :) –  Randolpho Jul 16 '13 at 21:15
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