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Other than looping through each element in an array and setting each one to null, is there a native function in Java / processing to simply empty an array (or destroy it, to be able to redeclare it as a new array)?

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What type of array? –  Adam Nov 17 '10 at 20:07
    
something like this - float[] xco=new float[1024]; –  ina Nov 17 '10 at 20:11
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Java is designed so you don't have to worry about this. You should be able to arrange your code so you don't have to do anything. For the few examples where it might make a difference, they can easily be refactored so this is not needed. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 17 '10 at 20:22
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6 Answers

There's

Arrays.fill(myArray, null);

Not that it does anything different than you'd do on your own (it just loops through every element and sets it to null). It's not native in that it's pure Java code that performs this, but it is a library function if maybe that's what you meant.

This of course doesn't allow you to resize the array (to zero), if that's what you meant by "empty". Array sizes are fixed, so if you want the "new" array to have different dimensions you're best to just reassign the reference to a new array as the other answers demonstrate. Better yet, use a List type like an ArrayList which can have variable size.

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There is no reason to loop through an array an null out every entry. What do you gain when you do this over simply reassigning a new value to the array? (Sorry for the comment on the old answer.) –  jjnguy Aug 30 '12 at 13:07
    
@jjnguy: I could see an implementation of an array list doing this for the clear operation. –  Mark Peters Aug 31 '12 at 18:35
    
Instead of just doing backingStore = new Type[size]? –  jjnguy Aug 31 '12 at 20:13
    
@jjnguy: Sure. Zeroing the array is a lot more efficient than creating a new one (particularly when the JLS requires the new array to be zeroed out anyway). In fact, this is exactly what OpenJDK's ArrayList.clear() does: it sets the size to zero and then iterates over the array, zeroing each index. –  Mark Peters Sep 1 '12 at 5:05
    
Interesting. It seems like it would be way less efficient to have to iterate over the entire array. W/e, I'll believe you. I don't have any evidence to support my claim anyway. –  jjnguy Sep 1 '12 at 18:54
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You can simply assign null to the reference. (This will work for any type of array, not just ints)

int[] arr = new int[]{1, 2, 3, 4};
arr = null;

This will 'clear out' the array. You can also assign a new array to that reference if you like:

int[] arr = new int[]{1, 2, 3, 4};
arr = new int[]{6, 7, 8, 9};

If you are worried about memory leaks, don't be. The garbage collector will clean up any references left by the array.

Another example:

float[] arr = ;// some array that you want to clear
arr = new float[arr.length];

This will create a new float[] initialized to the default value for float.

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i get the nullpointerexception error when i simply empty an array assigning it to null... the idea is that the same array is reused in each iterations, but the numbers do not matter after each one, so it can be emptied. –  ina Nov 17 '10 at 20:10
    
not so safe since it will break every part of code which uses that array and throw a NullPointerException –  Jack Nov 17 '10 at 20:12
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@ina, if you assign null to the array, you will not be able to use it anymore. You will have to redeclare an array into that reference. See my second example. –  jjnguy Nov 17 '10 at 20:12
    
@ina, or, see my 3rd example. –  jjnguy Nov 17 '10 at 20:14
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array = new String[array.length];
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I just want to add something to Mark's comment. If you want to reuse array without additional allocation, just use it again and override existing values with new ones. It will work if you fill the array sequentially. In this case just remember the last initialized element and use array until this index. It is does not matter that there is some garbage in the end of the array.

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This is exactly what ArrayList does for you behind the scenes. It works to do it yourself, but is more cumbersome and easy to make mistakes with. IMO, better to use a Collection class. But if you're stuck with using an array directly, this is a good observation. –  Mark Peters Nov 17 '10 at 21:04
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Faster clearing than Arrays.fill is with this (From Fast Serialization Lib). I just use arrayCopy (is native) to clear the array:

static Object[] EmptyObjArray = new Object[10000];

public static void clear(Object[] arr) {
    final int arrlen = arr.length;
    clear(arr, arrlen);
}

public static void clear(Object[] arr, int arrlen) {
    int count = 0;
    final int length = EmptyObjArray.length;
    while( arrlen - count > length) {
        System.arraycopy(EmptyObjArray,0,arr,count, length);
        count += length;
    }
    System.arraycopy(EmptyObjArray,0,arr,count, arrlen -count);
}
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Create array:

ArrayList<String> User = new ArrayList<String>();

This Array can be cleared by

User.clear();
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