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I am confused about how the CSS for z-index, overflow hidden, and position fixed work together in Firefox 3.6. Consider this example:

The first DIV.fix_z0 is position fixed with z-index 0 and overflow hidden. Inside is DIV.abs_z1 with position absolute with z-index 1. Inside that is DIV.fix_z2 with position fixed and z-index 2. I would expect all of .fix_z2 to be visible even if it is outside the viewport of .fix_z0 since it is both fixed and has a higher z-index than the base DIV.

In IE 8 this works as expected, but in FF 3.6, DIV.fix_z2 is clipped by the bounds of .fix_z0. Both elements are fixed, but one is nested within the other. W3C specs indicate that fixed elements should be removed from document flow, but what happens when they are nested? Also, since the containing element .abs_z1 has a higher z-index, this should set up a new z-index context and everything in .abs_z1 should be above .fix_z0 (making the z-index on .fix_z2 irrelevant, but I included it to see if it made a difference.)

The complicating factor is the z-index. If we take an alternate example, inside .fix_z0 a DIV.abs_znone with position absolute and no z-index. Inside this, we place DIV.fix_z1 with position fixed and z-index 1. Now the DIV.fix_z1 is not clipped by .fix_z0. It seems to me that either both should be clipped or both should not be clipped. Is this a bug or am I misunderstanding the rules of CSS? Below is the code to reproduce.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
<title>Z-Index Woes</title>
<style type="text/css">
    body {
        background-color: black;
    }

    div.fix_z0 {
        position: fixed;
        left: 100px;
        top: 100px;
        bottom: 100px;
        right: 100px;
        background-color: #606060;
        overflow: hidden;
        z-index: 0;
    }

    div.abs_z1 {
        position: absolute;
        left: 50px;
        top: 50px;
        width: 200px;
        height: 200px;
        background-color: #550000;
        z-index: 1;
    }

    div.fix_z2 {
        position: fixed;
        left: 50px;
        top: 50px;
        width: 150px;
        height: 150px;
        background-color: #888800;
        z-index: 2;
    }

    div.abs_znone {
        position: absolute;
        right: 50px;
        bottom: 50px;
        width: 200px;
        height: 200px;
        background-color: #005500;
    }


    div.fix_z1 {
        position: fixed;
        right: 50px;
        bottom: 50px;
        width: 150px;
        height: 150px;
        background-color: #888800;
        z-index: 1;
    }

    p {
        position: absolute;
        font-size: 12pt;
        color: #EFEFEF;
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
    }

    p.center {
        text-align: center;
        width: 100%;
    }

    p.right {
        right: 0;
    }

    p.bottom {
        bottom: 0;
    }

</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="fix_z0">
        <p class="center">pos: fixed, z:0, overflow: hidden</p>
        <div class="abs_z1">
            <p class="right">pos: abs, z:1</p>
            <div class="fix_z2">
                <p class="right bottom">pos: fix, z:2</p>
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="abs_znone">
            <p>pos: abs, z: none</p>
            <div class="fix_z1">
                <p>pos: fix, z:1</p>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

UPDATE 11/18/10: Both responses thus far seem to indicate that .fix_z2 and .fix_z1 should be clipped by .fix_z0. This would make IE8 100% wrong and FF 50% wrong on the sample code.

I would argue that both DIVs should NOT be clipped since they are fixed. W3C establishes fixed positioning as a subset of absolute and an absolutely positioned element:

establishes a new containing block for normal flow children and absolutely (but not fixed) positioned descendants. [W3C]

Therefore, it seems to me that neither .fix_z0 or .abs_z1 or .abs_znone should establish a new containing block by which the fixed contents are clipped.

The W3C Z-Index standard values are:

integer: This integer is the stack level of the generated box in the current stacking context. The box also establishes a local stacking context in which its stack level is '0'.

auto: The stack level of the generated box in the current stacking context is the same as its parent's box. The box does not establish a new local stacking context.

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/visuren.html#z-index

I don't see why z-index affects FF, but it has the following effect: Since .abs_znone has no z-index, it has the same stacking context as its parent .fix_z0 and .fix_z1 would have a z-index in relation to any children of .fix_z0. The result is DIV.fix_z1 is NOT clipped by .fix_z0. Conversely, .abs_z1 establishes a new stacking context since it has a z-index and .fix_z2 would have a z-index in relation to any children of .abs_z1 but for some reason, this results in .fix_z2 being clipped by .fix_z0

Bottom line: I am still looking for some answers. Is IE or FF adhering to standards here? What is causing clipping on one DIV in FF but not the other? My current take is that IE is correct (for a change) and that the FF behavior is buggy.

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2 Answers 2

It seems like the FF display is correct. If you have overflow:hidden on an element all child elements will only be displayed if they are in the bounds of the parent objects.

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I agree with your logic, but if this were true then fix_z1 should also be clipped since it is a descendant of fix_z0. Instead it is not clipped. –  Jared Nov 17 '10 at 21:20

A variation of this question was asked here, and one of the answerers gave this link to solve, but that was for IE7. I tried the doctype suggestion, but it didn't yield any immediate results.

(BTW, in your code example, if you give .abs_znone a z-index, that ties it to its parent and it behaves properly. A clue, perhaps?)

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These issues did deal with z-index, but differently from my case. They are more about layering and my issue is with clipping. In my case, IE is actually doing what I want and FF is not, therefore I am not looking to "fix" anything with IE. The z-index seems to be having some clipping side-effects in FF and I have some disagreement with the current posts about whether the IE behavior is standards-compliant or not. See my update in the question. –  Jared Nov 19 '10 at 3:07

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