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In R, let's say we have a vector
area = c(rep(c(26:30), 5), rep(c(500:504), 5), rep(c(550:554), 5), rep(c(76:80), 5)) and another vector yield = c(1:100).
Now, say I want to index like so:

> yield[area==27]
[1]  2  7 12 17 22
> yield[area==501]
[1] 27 32 37 42 47

No problem, right? But weird things start happening when I try to index it by using c(A, B). (and even weirder when I try c(min:max) ...)

> yield[area==c(27,501)]
[1]  7 17 32 42

What I'm expecting is of course the instances that are present in both of the other examples, not just some weird combination of them. This works when I can use the pipe OR operator:

> yield[area==27 | area==501]
 [1]  2  7 12 17 22 27 32 37 42 47

But what if I'm working with a range? Say I want index it by the range c(27:503)? In my real example there are a lot more data points and ranges, so it makes more sense, please don't suggest I do it by hand, which would essentially mean:

yield[area==27 | area==28 | area==29 | ... | area==303 | ... | area==500 | area==501]

There must be a better way...

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You want to use %in%. Also notice that c(27:503) and 27:503 yield the same object.

> yield[area %in% 27:503]
 [1]   2   3   4   5   7   8   9  10  12  13  14  15  17
[14]  18  19  20  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  31  32
[27]  33  34  36  37  38  39  41  42  43  44  46  47  48
[40]  49  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87
[53]  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99 100
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Awesome, thanks :) Also, where on earth is this documented? How am I supposed to find it without asking? What do I ask the help about? The unhelpful help I call it :P –  gakera Nov 17 '10 at 20:43
    
@gakera: it's in ?match. You're supposed to find it by guessing better keywords or reading the full reference manual. :-P I think I first came across match via the "See Also" section of ?grep. –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 17 '10 at 20:51
    
Haha, guessing better keywords or reading the full manual, I love it! R is so user friendly :D Thank you again. –  gakera Nov 17 '10 at 21:01
    
@gakera: out of curiosity, where would you expect something like that to be documented? I.e. where did you look? Maybe a link to ?match should be added somewhere... –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 17 '10 at 21:06
    
One of the tricks to learn (or gotcha's to avoid) is the need to quote some arguments to the "?" operator when seeking "help". Had you typed ?"%in%" , you would have been offered the help page for match(). There is also a link to "%in%" on the set function page which describes union(x, y), intersect(x, y), setdiff(x, y), and setequal(x, y) .... all useful in the right circumstance since they return the original elements rather than a logical vector. [I checked "An introduction to R" .. nothing about %in% or match().] –  BondedDust Nov 17 '10 at 21:12
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Why not use subset?

subset(yield, area > 26 & area < 504) ## for indexes
subset(area, area > 26 & area < 504) ## for values
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Why not use it? One reason: to heed the Warning section in ?subset, since yield[area > 26 & area < 504] is equivalent. –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 17 '10 at 22:10
    
What warning section? –  Brandon Bertelsen Nov 17 '10 at 22:12
1  
Warning: This is a convenience function intended for use interactively. For programming it is better to use the standard subsetting functions like ‘[’, and in particular the non-standard evaluation of argument ‘subset’ can have unanticipated consequences. –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 17 '10 at 22:13
    
@Brandon: please don't take me too seriously here. I started hunting for reasons "why not" since that was in the prelude to your answer. ;-) –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 17 '10 at 22:20
    
No worries. Interestingly, in my ?subset I don't have a section that says that. What version are you using? –  Brandon Bertelsen Nov 17 '10 at 23:03
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