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Consider the following C++ code,

template <typename Derived>
struct A
{
    bool usable_;
};

template <typename Derived>
struct B : A< B<Derived> >
{
    void foo()
    {
        usable_ = false;
    }
};

struct C : B<C>
{
    void foo()
    {
        usable_ = true;
    }
};

int main()
{
    C c;
}

I got compilation error: In member function void B<Derived>::foo():

template_inherit.cpp:12: error: 'usable_' was not declared in this scope.

Why is that ? Any good fix ?

share|improve this question
    
What compiler is this? –  John Dibling Nov 17 '10 at 23:11
3  
struct B : A< B<Derived> > wat. –  GManNickG Nov 17 '10 at 23:14
2  
@GMan haha CRTP in disguise :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 17 '10 at 23:18
1  
Mind: 'sploded. –  wilhelmtell Nov 17 '10 at 23:42

1 Answer 1

That's because usable_ is a non-dependent name, so it is looked up at the time the template is parsed, instead of being looked up at instantiation (when the base class is known).

Unqualified name lookup will not lookup and non-dependent names are never looked up in dependent base classes. You can make the name usable_ dependent as follows, which will also get rid of unqualified name lookup

this->usable_ = false;

// equivalent to: A<B>::usable_ = false;
A< B<Derived> >::usable_ = false;

B::usable_ = false;

All of these will work. Or you can declare the name in the derived class with a using-declaration

template <typename Derived>
struct B : A< B<Derived> >
{
    using A< B<Derived> >::usable_;

    void foo()
    {
        usable_ = false;
    }
};

Note that in C there will be no problem - it only affects B.

share|improve this answer
    
The last GotW talks about it. Alas, Herb Sutter's usual well-written following solution didn't ensue. :( –  wilhelmtell Nov 17 '10 at 23:55

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