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Given the output of git ... --stat:

 3 files changed, 72 insertions(+), 21 deletions(-)
 3 files changed, 27 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)
 4 files changed, 164 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 9 files changed, 395 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 1 files changed, 3 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 1 deletions(-)
 2 files changed, 57 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 10 files changed, 189 insertions(+), 230 deletions(-)
 3 files changed, 111 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 8 files changed, 61 insertions(+), 80 deletions(-)

I wanted to produce the sum of the numeric columns but preserve the formatting of the line. In the interest of generality, I produced this awk script that automatically sums any numeric columns and produces a summary line:

{
    for (i = 1; i <= NF; ++i) {
        if ($i + 0 != 0) {
            numeric[i] = 1;
            total[i] += $i;
        }
    }
}
END {
    # re-use non-numeric columns of last line
    for (i = 1; i <= NF; ++i) {
        if (numeric[i])
            $i = total[i]
    }
    print
}

Yielding:

 44 files changed, 1080 insertions(+), 338 deletions(-)

Awk has several features that simplify the problem, like automatic string->number conversion, all arrays as associative arrays, and the ability to overwrite auto-split positional parameters and then print the equivalent lines.

Is there a better language for this hack?

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Very cool script Ben! –  icyrock.com Nov 18 '10 at 0:29
    
This did turn into an interesting code-golf question, but I feel I should ask what you're trying to accomplish here. Are your "X files changed" lines coming from git log? If so, simply summing the number of files changed isn't accurate if you've changed the same file in multiple changesets. If you want to find what happened between two points, you might want git diff --stat <start> <end>. –  MikeSep Nov 19 '10 at 17:06
    
@Mike: The "X files changed" is definitely wrong, the other totals are close to what I wanted. The revisions in question aren't perfectly sequential. –  Ben Jackson Nov 19 '10 at 17:14

11 Answers 11

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Perl - 47 char

Inspired by ChristopheD's awk solution. Used with the -an command-line switch. 43 chars + 4 chars for the command-line switch:

$i-=@a=map{($b[$i++]+=$_)||$_}@F}{print"@a"

I can get it to 45 (41 + -ap switch) with a little bit of cheating:

$i=0;$_="Ctrl-M@{[map{($b[$i++]+=$_)||$_}@F]}"

Older, hash-based 66 char solution:

@a=(),s#(\d+)(\D+)#$b{$a[@a]=$2}+=$1#gefor<>;print map$b{$_}.$_,@a
share|improve this answer
    
I haven't worked out quite how it works yet but I note that the true input happens to start with a space (direct from git) and this inserts a bogus "0" column: 0 44 files changed, 1080 insertions(+), 338 deletions(-) –  Ben Jackson Nov 19 '10 at 23:08
    
@Ben Jackson - that's a bummer - I'll see what I can do –  mob Nov 19 '10 at 23:13
    
Do I read 'gefor' correctly as s///ge for? I had no idea perl would find a token like that at the end of valid substitution options! –  Ben Jackson Nov 20 '10 at 0:33

Ruby — 87

puts ' '+[*$<].map(&:split).inject{|i,j|[0,3,5].map{|k|i[k]=i[k].to_i+j[k].to_i};i}*' '
share|improve this answer
    
Wow. +1 for [*$<] which is awesome and golfy. I guess that works because $< defines a .to_a method that reads everything? And because splat apparently calls .to_a? (I'm not sure this response actually qualifies because you hardwired the columns, but I still like it.) –  DigitalRoss Nov 18 '10 at 21:19
    
I had to use [0,3,5] to make code shorter ,.) –  Nakilon Nov 18 '10 at 23:05
    
hard-coded column numbers? ewww! while you are at it, why not abbreviate to puts '44 files changed, 1080 insertions(+), 338 deletions(-)' –  Nas Banov Nov 19 '10 at 9:33
1  
@Nas Banov, because number always changing, not format. –  Nakilon Nov 19 '10 at 16:51
    
My original does auto-detect the numeric columns. I was thinking of making a general tool I could keep in my bin directory to sum columns of any output. –  Ben Jackson Nov 19 '10 at 17:16

Python - 101 chars

import sys
print" ".join(`sum(map(int,x))`if"A">x[0]else x[0]for x in zip(*map(str.split,sys.stdin)))'

Using reduce is longer at 126 chars

import sys
print" ".join(reduce(lambda X,Y:[str(int(x)+int(y))if"A">x[0]else x for x,y in zip(X,Y)],map(str.split,sys.stdin)))
share|improve this answer

AWK - 63 characters

(in a bash script, $1 is the filename provided as command line argument):

awk -F' ' '{x+=$1;y+=$4;z+=$6}END{print x,$2,$3,y,$5,z,$7}' $1

One could of course also pipe the input in (would save another 3 characters when allowed).

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1  
I think the "program" is the thing between the "{ .. }" so 47 chars on my count. Well done! –  belisarius Nov 23 '10 at 4:31
    
The initial space is lacking in the output, though. –  belisarius Nov 23 '10 at 4:40
    
This is not flexible, the columns are HARDCODED –  Nas Banov Nov 23 '10 at 10:33
1  
The question is well too under-specified to provide a generic, flexible solution (without taking a lot of assumptions about the format) imho... –  ChristopheD Nov 23 '10 at 10:58
    
@Nas well ... a column is a column ... a thing between two voids ... how do you softcode it? :) –  belisarius Nov 24 '10 at 1:19

This problem is not challenging or difficult... it is "cute" though.

Here is solution in Python:

import sys
r = []
for s in sys.stdin:
    r = map(lambda x,y:(x or 0)+int(y) if y.isdigit() else y, r, s.split())
print ' '.join(map(str, r))

What does it do... it keeps tally in r while proceeding line by line. Splits the line, then for each element of the list, if it is a number, adds it to the tally or keeps it as string. At the end they all get re-mapped to string and merged with spaces in between to be printed.

Alternative, more "algebraic" implementation, if we did not care about reading all input at once:

import sys

def totalize(l):
    try:    r = str(sum(map(int,l)))
    except: r = l[-1]
    return r

print ' '.join(map(totalize, zip(*map(str.split, sys.stdin))))

What does this one do? totalize() takes a list of strings and tries to calculate sum of the numbers; if that fails, it simply returns the last one. zip() is fed with a matrix that is list of rows, each of them being list of column items in the row - zip transposes the matrix so it turns into list of column items and then totalize is invoked on each column and the results are joined as before.

share|improve this answer
    
Only objection: Awk version handles floats as well. Perhaps not a difficult problem, but I did learn something about python I didn't know! –  Ben Jackson Nov 18 '10 at 2:56
    
@Ben Jackson: use the 2nd solution, substitute float for int there. –  Nas Banov Nov 18 '10 at 3:02

At the expense of making your code slightly longer, I moved the main parsing into the BEGIN clause so the main clause is only processing numeric fields. For a slightly larger input file, I was able to measure a significant improvement in speed.

BEGIN {
    getline
    for (i = 1; i <= NF; ++i) {
        # need to test for 0, too, in this version
        if ($i == 0 || $i + 0 != 0) {
            numeric[i] = 1;
            total[i] = $i;
        }
    }
}
{
    for (i in numeric) total[i] += $i
}
END {
    # re-use non-numeric columns of last line
    for (i = 1; i <= NF; ++i) {
        if (numeric[i])
            $i = total[i]
    }
    print
}

I made a test file using your data and doing paste file file file ... and cat file file file ... so that the result had 147 fields and 1960 records. My version took about 1/4 as long as yours. On the original data, the difference was not measurable.

share|improve this answer
    
Somehow I never in all my awk thought of BEGIN { getline ... } which is cleaner than tricks like init == 0 { ...; init = 1}. I do like the ability of the original to ignore headers, though. –  Ben Jackson Nov 18 '10 at 9:02

JavaScript (Rhino) - 183 154 139 bytes

Golfed:

x=[n=0,0,0];s=[];readFile('/dev/stdin').replace(/(\d+)(\D+)/g,function(a,b,c){x[n]+=+b;s[n++]=c;n%=3});print(x[0]+s[0]+x[1]+s[1]+x[2]+s[2])

Readable-ish:

x=[n=0,0,0];
s=[];

readFile('/dev/stdin').replace(/(\d+)(\D+)/g,function(a,b,c){
    x[n]+=+b;
    s[n++]=c;
    n%=3
});

print(x[0]+s[0]+x[1]+s[1]+x[2]+s[2]);
share|improve this answer

PHP 152 130 Chars

Input:

$i = "
3 files changed, 72 insertions(+), 21 deletions(-) 
3 files changed, 27 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-) 
4 files changed, 164 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-) 
9 files changed, 395 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-) 
1 files changed, 3 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-) 
1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 1 deletions(-) 
2 files changed, 57 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-) 
10 files changed, 189 insertions(+), 230 deletions(-) 
3 files changed, 111 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-) 
8 files changed, 61 insertions(+), 80 deletions(-)";

Code:

$a = explode(" ", $i);

foreach($a as $k => $v){
    if($k % 7 == 0)
        $x += $v;

    if(3-$k % 7 == 0)
        $y += $v;

    if(5-$k % 7 == 0)
        $z += $v;   

}

echo "$x $a[1] $a[2] $y $a[4] $z $a[6]";

Output:

44 files changed, 1080 insertions(+), 338 deletions(-)

Note: explode() will require that there is a space char before the new line.

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Haskell - 151 135 bytes

import Char
c a b|all isDigit(a++b)=show$read a+read b|True=a
main=interact$unwords.foldl1(zipWith c).map words.filter(not.null).lines

... but I'm sure it can be done better/smaller.

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Just from my mind: I guess it's shorter to hard-code the position of columns and convert with read. –  FUZxxl Nov 20 '10 at 13:50

Lua, 140 bytes

I know Lua isn't the best golfing language, but compared by the size of the runtimes, it does pretty well I think.

f,i,d,s=0,0,0,io.read"*a"for g,a,j,b,e,c in s:gmatch("(%d+)(.-)(%d+)(.-)(%d+)(.-)")do f,i,d=f+g,i+j,d+e end print(table.concat{f,a,i,b,d,c})
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PHP, 176 166 164 159 158 153

for($a=-1;$a<count($l=explode("
",$i));$r=explode(" ",$l[++$a]))for($b=-1;$b<count($r);$c[++$b]=is_numeric($r[$b])?$c[$b]+$r[$b]:$r[$b]);echo join(" ",$c);

This would, however, require the whole input in $i... A variant with $i replaced with $_POST["i"] so it would be sent in a textarea... Has 162 chars:

for($a=-1;$a<count($l=explode("
",$_POST["i"]));$r=explode(" ",$l[$a++]))for($b=0;$b<count($r);$c[$b]=is_numeric($r[$b])?$c[$b]+$r[$b]:$r[$b])$b++;echo join(" ",$c);

This is a version with

NO HARDCODED COLUMNS

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