Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been trying to figure out how to initialize an object using a prototype in order to escape using global variables, which I first learned about here. I began implementing my own version of the code found in the accepted answer.

function XML_Data() {
  this.data = null;
}

XML_Data.prototype = {
 GetXML: function() {
  $.ajax({
   type: "GET",
   url: "questions.xml",
   dataType: "xml",
   success: function(xml) {
    this.data=xml;
   } //close success
  });//close AJAX  
 },

 UseXML: function() {
  alert(this.data)
 }
};

(My implementation of the script)


However, I've run into a problem. When I run the functions shown here by using this bit of code:

var data = new XML_Data();
data.GetXML();
data.UseXML();

I get an alert that says "null". I've been through the code about a dozen times, but as this is my first time working with Javascript, there's quite obviously something I've missed. Could you point that out?

Thanks, Elliot Bonneville.

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to use the Ajax data immediately? How often do you get new data via Ajax? –  Šime Vidas Nov 18 '10 at 1:42
    
Just once, at the beginning of the call. –  Elliot Bonneville Nov 18 '10 at 2:10
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just of note

var data = new XML_Data();
data.GetXML();  //This will run the ajax request
data.UseXML();  //This will most likely run before the ajax request is finished.

Publishing events in Jquery would problably work,but I havent tested this code.

function XML_Data() {
  this.data = null;
}

XML_Data.prototype = {
 GetXML: function() {
  $.ajax({
   type: "GET",
      url: "questions.xml",
   dataType: "html",
   success: function(xml) {
    this.data=xml;
    $(window).trigger("myAjaxEvent");
   } //close success
  });//close AJAX  
 },

 UseXML: function() {
  alert(this.data)
 }
};


$(document).ready( function () {
    var data = new XML_Data();
    $(window).bind("myAjaxEvent", function () {
      data.UseXML();
    });

    data.GetXML();

});
share|improve this answer
    
Is that so? How would I fix that? –  Elliot Bonneville Nov 18 '10 at 1:26
    
@Elliot ... you could try publishing events using jquery –  John Hartsock Nov 18 '10 at 1:50
    
Ah, yes, that could work. Thanks. –  Elliot Bonneville Nov 18 '10 at 2:15
add comment

The code you have now is attempting to run synchronously (in order) using a non-blocking asynchronous API. The UseXML call happens before the GetXML call actually finishes doing its AJAX thing, because it's asynchronous.

You could write this in an asynchronous pattern (in which this.UseXML is called directly on success of the AJAX request), or a synchronous pattern (in which "async:false" is passed to the AJAX call). The asynchronous pattern is much more common in JavaScript development, as it is much more powerful, and synchronous requests block the UI in the browser by preventing script execution, but synchronous is much easier to do for little things.

See http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.