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I need to find the caller of a method. Is it possible using stacktrace or reflection?

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2  
Just wondering, but why would you need to do this? –  Juliet Jan 7 '09 at 17:51
    
I have a Parent class (MVC model) with a notifier event and only setters of my subclasses call this method. i dont want to litter my code with a redundant argument. I'd rather let the method in parent class figure out the setter that called it. –  Sathish Jan 7 '09 at 17:56
12  
@Sathish Sounds like you should re-think that design –  krosenvold Jan 7 '09 at 17:59
1  
Agreed about the re-design. –  Bill K Jan 7 '09 at 18:04
1  
@Juliet As part of refactoring a large chuck of code, recently I've changed a method that is used by many things. There is a certain way to detect if code was using the new method properly, so I was printing the class and line number that called it in those cases. Outside of logging, I see no real purpose for something like this. Although I kind of want to write API's now that throw a DontNameYourMethodFooException if the calling method is named foo. –  Cruncher May 16 at 20:06

12 Answers 12

up vote 177 down vote accepted
StackTraceElement[] stackTraceElements = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()

According to the Javadocs:

The last element of the array represents the bottom of the stack, which is the least recent method invocation in the sequence.

A StackTraceElement has getClassName(), getFileName(), getLineNumber() and getMethodName().

You will have to experiment to determine which index you want (probably stackTraceElements[1] or [2]).

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3  
I should note that getStackTrace() still creates an Exception, so this isn't really faster--just more convenient. –  Michael Myers Jan 7 '09 at 18:08
15  
Note that this method will not give you the caller, but only the type of the caller. You will not have a reference to the object calling your method. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 7 '09 at 18:30
    
@mmyers: That's good to know, but I think it expresses the intent better than creating the throw-away exception, anyway. –  Lawrence Dol Jan 8 '09 at 8:44
1  
Just a side note, but on a 1.5 JVM Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace() seems to be a lot slower than creating a new Exception() (approximately 3 times slower). But as already noted, you shouldn't be using code like this in a performance-critical area anyway. ;) A 1.6 JVM only seems to be ~10% slower and, as Software Monkey said, it expresses the intent better than the "new Exception" way. –  GaZ Jul 7 '09 at 14:42
11  
@Eelco Thread.currentThread() is cheap. Thread.getStackTrace() is expensive because, unlike Throwable.fillInStackTrace(), there's no guarantee the method is called by the same thread it's examining, so the JVM has to create a "safepoint" -- locking the heap and stack. See this bug report: bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6375302 –  David Moles Dec 8 '11 at 23:30

An alternative solution can be found in a comment to this request for enhancement. It uses the getClassContext() method of a custom SecurityManager and seems to be faster than the stack trace method.

The following program tests the speed of the different suggested methods (the most interesting bit is in the inner class SecurityManagerMethod):

/**
 * Test the speed of various methods for getting the caller class name
 */
public class TestGetCallerClassName {

  /**
   * Abstract class for testing different methods of getting the caller class name
   */
  private static abstract class GetCallerClassNameMethod {
      public abstract String getCallerClassName(int callStackDepth);
      public abstract String getMethodName();
  }

  /**
   * Uses the internal Reflection class
   */
  private static class ReflectionMethod extends GetCallerClassNameMethod {
      public String getCallerClassName(int callStackDepth) {
          return sun.reflect.Reflection.getCallerClass(callStackDepth).getName();
      }

      public String getMethodName() {
          return "Reflection";
      }
  }

  /**
   * Get a stack trace from the current thread
   */
  private static class ThreadStackTraceMethod extends GetCallerClassNameMethod {
      public String  getCallerClassName(int callStackDepth) {
          return Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[callStackDepth].getClassName();
      }

      public String getMethodName() {
          return "Current Thread StackTrace";
      }
  }

  /**
   * Get a stack trace from a new Throwable
   */
  private static class ThrowableStackTraceMethod extends GetCallerClassNameMethod {

      public String getCallerClassName(int callStackDepth) {
          return new Throwable().getStackTrace()[callStackDepth].getClassName();
      }

      public String getMethodName() {
          return "Throwable StackTrace";
      }
  }

  /**
   * Use the SecurityManager.getClassContext()
   */
  private static class SecurityManagerMethod extends GetCallerClassNameMethod {
      public String  getCallerClassName(int callStackDepth) {
          return mySecurityManager.getCallerClassName(callStackDepth);
      }

      public String getMethodName() {
          return "SecurityManager";
      }

      /** 
       * A custom security manager that exposes the getClassContext() information
       */
      static class MySecurityManager extends SecurityManager {
          public String getCallerClassName(int callStackDepth) {
              return getClassContext()[callStackDepth].getName();
          }
      }

      private final static MySecurityManager mySecurityManager =
          new MySecurityManager();
  }

  /**
   * Test all four methods
   */
  public static void main(String[] args) {
      testMethod(new ReflectionMethod());
      testMethod(new ThreadStackTraceMethod());
      testMethod(new ThrowableStackTraceMethod());
      testMethod(new SecurityManagerMethod());
  }

  private static void testMethod(GetCallerClassNameMethod method) {
      long startTime = System.nanoTime();
      String className = null;
      for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
          className = method.getCallerClassName(2);
      }
      printElapsedTime(method.getMethodName(), startTime);
  }

  private static void printElapsedTime(String title, long startTime) {
      System.out.println(title + ": " + ((double)(System.nanoTime() - startTime))/1000000 + " ms.");
  }
}

An example of the output from my 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo MacBook running Java 1.6.0_17:

Reflection: 10.195 ms.
Current Thread StackTrace: 5886.964 ms.
Throwable StackTrace: 4700.073 ms.
SecurityManager: 1046.804 ms.

The internal Reflection method is much faster than the others. Getting a stack trace from a newly created Throwable is faster than getting it from the current Thread. And among the non-internal ways of finding the caller class the custom SecurityManager seems to be the fastest.

Update

As lyomi points out in this comment the sun.reflect.Reflection.getCallerClass() method has been disabled by default in Java 7 update 40 and removed completely in Java 8. Read more about this in this issue in the Java bug database.

Update 2

As zammbi has found, Oracle was forced to back out of the change that removed the sun.reflect.Reflection.getCallerClass(). It is still available in Java 8 (but it is deprecated).

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Thanks for the comparison in speed. Is a StackTrace really that slow? –  Kevin Jun 21 '12 at 20:44
1  
Yes, it seems like that. But note that the timings I give in the example is for a million calls - so depending on how you are using this it might not be a problem. –  Johan Kaving Jun 27 '12 at 11:09
    
For me removing reflection from my project resulted in a 10x speed increase. –  Kevin Jun 27 '12 at 14:20
1  
It actually doesn't need to. You can verify it by modifying the code above to print the returned className (and I suggest reducing the loop count to 1). You will see that all methods return the same className - TestGetCallerClassName. –  Johan Kaving Aug 7 '12 at 6:07
1  
getCallerClass is deprecated and will be removed in 7u40.. sad :( –  lyomi Aug 5 '13 at 2:02

Sounds like you're trying to avoid passing a reference to this into the method. Passing this is way better than finding the caller through the current stack trace. Refactoring to a more OO design is even better. You shouldn't need to know the caller. Pass a callback object if necessary.

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4  
++ Knowing the caller is too much information. If you must, you could pass in an interface, but there is a good chance that a major refactoring is needed. @satish should post his code and let us have some fun with it :) –  Bill K Jan 7 '09 at 18:19
6  
Valid reasons for wanting to do this exist. I've had a few occasions where I found it helpful during testing for instance. –  Eelco Feb 2 '10 at 5:23
2  
@chillenious I know :) I've done it myself to create a method like LoggerFactory.getLogger(MyClass.class) where I didn't have to pass in the class literal. It's still rarely the right thing to do. –  Craig P. Motlin Feb 2 '10 at 15:05
2  
This is good advice in general, but it does not answer the question. –  Navin Nov 15 '13 at 20:38
    
This is useful for my project in generic.....lot of thanks –  Reegan Miranda Jan 18 at 7:38

This method does the same thing but a little more simply and possibly a little more performant and in the event you are using reflection, it skips those frames automatically. The only issue is it may not be present in non-Sun JVMs, although it is included in the runtime classes of JRockit 1.4-->1.6. (Point is, it is not a public class).

sun.reflect.Reflection

    /** Returns the class of the method <code>realFramesToSkip</code>
        frames up the stack (zero-based), ignoring frames associated
        with java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke() and its implementation.
        The first frame is that associated with this method, so
        <code>getCallerClass(0)</code> returns the Class object for
        sun.reflect.Reflection. Frames associated with
        java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke() and its implementation are
        completely ignored and do not count toward the number of "real"
        frames skipped. */
    public static native Class getCallerClass(int realFramesToSkip);

As far as what the realFramesToSkip value should be, the Sun 1.5 and 1.6 VM versions of java.lang.System, there is a package protected method called getCallerClass() which calls sun.reflect.Reflection.getCallerClass(3), but in my helper utility class I used 4 since there is the added frame of the helper class invocation.

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11  
Use of JVM implementation classes is a really bad idea. –  Lawrence Dol Jan 8 '09 at 8:42
5  
Noted. I did specify that it is not a public class, and the protected method getCallerClass() in java.lang.System is present across all the 1.5+ VMs I have looked at, including IBM, JRockit and Sun, but your assertion is conservatively sound. –  Nicholas Jan 8 '09 at 19:05
4  
@Software Monkey, well as usual, "it all depends". Doing something like this to assist in debugging or test logging--especially if it never ends up in production code--or if the deployment target is strictly the developer's PC, will probably be fine. Anyone who still thinks otherwise even in such cases: you'd need to actually explain the "really bad idea" reasoning better than just saying it's bad... –  Perce Mar 17 '13 at 21:29
4  
Also, by similar logic you could also argue that anytime you use a Hibernate-specific feature that isn't JPA compatible, that's always a "really bad idea". Or if you're going to use Oracle-specific features which aren't available in other databases, it's a "really bad idea". Sure it's a safer mindset and definitely good advice for certain uses, but automatically throwing away useful tools just because it won't work with a software configuration that you're, uh.. not using at all? That's a bit too inflexible and a little silly. –  Perce Mar 17 '13 at 21:39
2  
The unguarded use of vendor specific classes will present a higher likelihood of problems, but one should determine a path to gracefully degrade if the class in question is not present (or is prohibited for some reason). A policy of flat-out refusal to use any vendor specific classes is, in my opinion, a little naive. Poke around in the source code of some of the libraries you use in production and see if any of them do this. (sun.misc.Unsafe perhaps ?) –  Nicholas Jun 25 '13 at 14:03
     /**
       * Get the method name for a depth in call stack. <br />
       * Utility function
       * @param depth depth in the call stack (0 means current method, 1 means call method, ...)
       * @return method name
       */
      public static String getMethodName(final int depth)
      {
        final StackTraceElement[] ste = new Throwable().getStackTrace();

        //System. out.println(ste[ste.length-depth].getClassName()+"#"+ste[ste.length-depth].getMethodName());
        return ste[ste.length - depth].getMethodName();
      }


For example, if you try to get the calling method line for debug purpose, you need to get past the Utility class in which you code those static methods:
(old java1.4 code, just to illustrate a potential StackTraceElement usage)

    	/**
    	  * Returns the first "[class#method(line)]: " of the first class not equal to "StackTraceUtils". <br />
    	  * From the Stack Trace.
    	  * @return "[class#method(line)]: " (never empty, first class past StackTraceUtils)
    	  */
    	public static String getClassMethodLine()
    	{
    		return getClassMethodLine(null);
    	}

    	/**
    	  * Returns the first "[class#method(line)]: " of the first class not equal to "StackTraceUtils" and aclass. <br />
    	  * Allows to get past a certain class.
    	  * @param aclass class to get pass in the stack trace. If null, only try to get past StackTraceUtils. 
    	  * @return "[class#method(line)]: " (never empty, because if aclass is not found, returns first class past StackTraceUtils)
    	  */
    	public static String getClassMethodLine(final Class aclass)
    	{
    		final StackTraceElement st = getCallingStackTraceElement(aclass);
    		final String amsg = "[" + st.getClassName() + "#" + st.getMethodName() + "(" + st.getLineNumber()
    		+")] <" + Thread.currentThread().getName() + ">: ";
    		return amsg;
    	}

     /**
       * Returns the first stack trace element of the first class not equal to "StackTraceUtils" or "LogUtils" and aClass. <br />
       * Stored in array of the callstack. <br />
       * Allows to get past a certain class.
       * @param aclass class to get pass in the stack trace. If null, only try to get past StackTraceUtils. 
       * @return stackTraceElement (never null, because if aClass is not found, returns first class past StackTraceUtils)
       * @throws AssertionFailedException if resulting statckTrace is null (RuntimeException)
       */
      public static StackTraceElement getCallingStackTraceElement(final Class aclass)
      {
    	final Throwable           t         = new Throwable();
    	final StackTraceElement[] ste       = t.getStackTrace();
        int index = 1;
        final int limit = ste.length;
    	StackTraceElement   st        = ste[index];
    	String              className = st.getClassName();
    	boolean aclassfound = false;
    	if(aclass == null)
    	{
    		aclassfound = true;
    	}
    	StackTraceElement   resst = null;
        while(index < limit)
        {
        	if(shouldExamine(className, aclass) == true)
        	{
        		if(resst == null)
        		{
        			resst = st;
        		}
        		if(aclassfound == true)
        		{
        			final StackTraceElement ast = onClassfound(aclass, className, st);
        			if(ast != null)
        			{
        				resst = ast;
        				break;
        			}
        		}
        		else
        		{
        			if(aclass != null && aclass.getName().equals(className) == true)
        			{
        				aclassfound = true;
        			}
        		}
        	}
        	index = index + 1;
        	st        = ste[index];
            className = st.getClassName();
        }
        if(resst == null) 
        {
        	//Assert.isNotNull(resst, "stack trace should null"); //NO OTHERWISE circular dependencies 
        	throw new AssertionFailedException(StackTraceUtils.getClassMethodLine() + " null argument:" + "stack trace should null"); //$NON-NLS-1$
        }
    	return resst;
      }

      static private boolean shouldExamine(String className, Class aclass)
      {
    	  final boolean res = StackTraceUtils.class.getName().equals(className) == false && (className.endsWith("LogUtils"
    		) == false || (aclass !=null && aclass.getName().endsWith("LogUtils")));
    	  return res;
      }

      static private StackTraceElement onClassfound(Class aclass, String className, StackTraceElement st)
      {
    	  StackTraceElement   resst = null;
    	  if(aclass != null && aclass.getName().equals(className) == false)
    	  {
    		  resst = st;
    	  }
    	  if(aclass == null)
    	  {
    		  resst = st;
    	  }
    	  return resst;
      }
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I needed something that works with Java 1.4 and this answer was very helpful! Thank you! –  Reza Goodarzi Mar 7 at 6:03

I've done this before. You can just create a new exception and grab the stack trace on it without throwing it, then examine the stack trace. As the other answer says though, it's extremely costly--don't do it in a tight loop.

I've done it before for a logging utility on an app where performance didn't matter much (Performance rarely matters much at all, actually--as long as you display the result to an action such as a button click quickly).

It was before you could get the stack trace, exceptions just had .printStackTrace() so I had to redirect System.out to a stream of my own creation, then (new Exception()).printStackTrace(); Redirect System.out back and parse the stream. Fun stuff.

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Cool; you don't have to throw it ? –  krosenvold Jan 7 '09 at 18:00
    
Nope, At least that's how I remember it, I haven't done it in a few years, but I'm pretty sure that newing an exception is just creating an object, and throwing the exception doesn't do anything to it except pass it to the catch() clause. –  Bill K Jan 7 '09 at 18:05
    
Neat. I was inclined on throwing it to simulate an actual exception. –  Sathish Jan 7 '09 at 18:13
    
No, since Java 5 there is a method on Thread to get the current stack as an array of StackTraceElements; it's still not cheap, but cheaper than the old exception-parsing solution. –  Lawrence Dol Jan 8 '09 at 8:40
    
@Software Monkey Although I'm sure it's more appropriate, what makes you say that it's cheaper? I'd assume the same mechanism would be used, and if not, why make one slower when it does the same thing? –  Bill K Jan 8 '09 at 17:11

Eclipse users: Add/choose a java exception breakpoint of your choice (AccessException for instance). Now make your method trhow the exception you choose when called and the execution will suspend, giving you a nice backtrace.

This option by default present in Run menu, on the Debug perspective.

Being more specific, in a JSF application you can look for the EL resolvers, they will tell you exactly who requested that property/method

At least, you can always try the "Open call hierarchy" context menu to get an overview.

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Try to use this Maven plugin inspirited by the recommendation above https://github.com/leozc/lantern

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Here is a part of the code that I made based in the hints showed in this topic. Hope it helps.

(Feel free to make any suggestions to improve this code, please tell me)

The counter:

public class InstanceCount{
    private static Map<Integer, CounterInstanceLog> instanceMap = new HashMap<Integer, CounterInstanceLog>();
private CounterInstanceLog counterInstanceLog;


    public void count() {
        counterInstanceLog= new counterInstanceLog();
    if(counterInstanceLog.getIdHashCode() != 0){
    try {
        if (instanceMap .containsKey(counterInstanceLog.getIdHashCode())) {
         counterInstanceLog= instanceMap .get(counterInstanceLog.getIdHashCode());
    }

    counterInstanceLog.incrementCounter();

            instanceMap .put(counterInstanceLog.getIdHashCode(), counterInstanceLog);
    }

    (...)
}

And the object:

public class CounterInstanceLog{
    private int idHashCode;
    private StackTraceElement[] arrayStackTraceElements;
    private int instanceCount;
    private String callerClassName;

    private StackTraceElement getProjectClasses(int depth) {
      if(depth< 10){
        getCallerClassName(sun.reflect.Reflection.getCallerClass(depth).getName());
        if(getCallerClassName().startsWith("com.yourproject.model")){
            setStackTraceElements(Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace());
            setIdHashCode();
        return arrayStackTraceElements[depth];
        }
        //+2 because one new item are added to the stackflow
        return getProjectClasses(profundidade+2);           
      }else{
        return null;
      }
    }

    private void setIdHashCode() {
        if(getNomeClasse() != null){
            this.idHashCode = (getCallerClassName()).hashCode();
        }
    }

    public void incrementaContador() {
    this.instanceCount++;
}

    //getters and setters

    (...)



}
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import java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.PrintWriter;

class DBConnection {
    String createdBy = null;

    DBConnection(Throwable whoCreatedMe) {
        ByteArrayOutputStream os = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(os);
        whoCreatedMe.printStackTrace(pw);
        try {
            createdBy = os.toString();
            pw.close();
            os.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

public class ThrowableTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Throwable createdBy = new Throwable(
                "Connection created from DBConnectionManager");
        DBConnection conn = new DBConnection(createdBy);
        System.out.println(conn.createdBy);
    }
}

OR

public static interface ICallback<T> { T doOperation(); }


public class TestCallerOfMethod {

    public static <T> T callTwo(final ICallback<T> c){
        // Pass the object created at callee to the caller
        // From the passed object we can get; what is the callee name like below.
        System.out.println(c.getClass().getEnclosingMethod().getName());
        return c.doOperation();
    }

    public static boolean callOne(){
        ICallback callBackInstance = new ICallback(Boolean){
            @Override
            public Boolean doOperation() 
            {
                return true;
            }
        };
        return callTwo(callBackInstance);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
         callOne();
    }
}
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use this method:-

 StackTraceElement[] stacktrace = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace();
 stackTraceElement e = stacktrace[2];//maybe this number needs to be corrected
 System.out.println(e.getMethodName());

Caller of method example Code is here:-

public class TestString {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        TestString testString = new TestString();
        testString.doit1();
        testString.doit2();
        testString.doit3();
        testString.doit4();
    }

    public void doit() {
        StackTraceElement[] stacktrace = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace();
        StackTraceElement e = stacktrace[2];//maybe this number needs to be corrected
        System.out.println(e.getMethodName());
    }

    public void doit1() {
        doit();
    }

    public void doit2() {
        doit();
    }

    public void doit3() {
        doit();
    }

    public void doit4() {
        doit();
    }
}
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private void parseExceptionContents(
      final Exception exception,
      final OutputStream out)
   {
      final StackTraceElement[] stackTrace = exception.getStackTrace();
      int index = 0;
      for (StackTraceElement element : stackTrace)
      {
         final String exceptionMsg =
              "Exception thrown from " + element.getMethodName()
            + " in class " + element.getClassName() + " [on line number "
            + element.getLineNumber() + " of file " + element.getFileName() + "]";
         try
         {
            out.write((headerLine + newLine).getBytes());
            out.write((headerTitlePortion + index++ + newLine).getBytes() );
            out.write((headerLine + newLine).getBytes());
            out.write((exceptionMsg + newLine + newLine).getBytes());
            out.write(
               ("Exception.toString: " + element.toString() + newLine).getBytes());
         }
         catch (IOException ioEx)
         {
            System.err.println(
                 "IOException encountered while trying to write "
               + "StackTraceElement data to provided OutputStream.\n"
               + ioEx.getMessage() );
         }
      }
   }
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