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I have an int currentFontSize where I wanna compare with NSString stored in an C array, here is the code.

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    static NSString* fontSizeName[] = 
    {
        @"14",
        @"18",
        @"22",
        @"26",
        @"30",
        @"34",
    };

    int fontSizeSegmentID;
    int currentFontSize = 22;

    NSString *val = [NSString stringWithFormat: @"%i", currentFontSize];
    NSString *val2 = @"22";
    NSLog(@"the current font size is %i", currentFontSize);
    NSLog(@"the current font Value1 is %i", val);
    NSLog(@"the current font Value2 is %i",val2);
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 6; i++) {

        NSLog(@"fontSizeNAme:%d",fontSizeName[i]);
        NSLog(@"val:%d",val);

            if (fontSizeName[i] == val) {
                NSLog(@"They are equal");
                fontSizeSegmentID = i;
                break;
            }

            NSLog(@"the fontSizeSegmentID is: %i" , fontSizeSegmentID);
        }

    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}

the strage part is , val give me a return value of 1879919632, which make my comparison failed. The strange part is when I hardcode the NSString as val2 = @"22", the comparison become successful where val2 is: 4240, it's the same as:

NSLog(@"fontSizeNAme:%d",fontSizeName[i]);

here is my return in NSLog:

2010-11-18 16:56:52.784 testINT[26034:a0f] the current font size is 22
2010-11-18 16:56:52.786 testINT[26034:a0f] the current font Value1 is 1879919632
2010-11-18 16:56:52.787 testINT[26034:a0f] the current font Value2 is 4240
2010-11-18 16:56:52.788 testINT[26034:a0f] fontSizeNAme:4176
2010-11-18 16:56:52.788 testINT[26034:a0f] val:1879919632
2010-11-18 16:56:52.788 testINT[26034:a0f] the fontSizeSegmentID is: 32767
2010-11-18 16:56:52.789 testINT[26034:a0f] fontSizeNAme:4208
2010-11-18 16:56:52.789 testINT[26034:a0f] val:1879919632
2010-11-18 16:56:52.790 testINT[26034:a0f] the fontSizeSegmentID is: 32767
2010-11-18 16:56:52.790 testINT[26034:a0f] fontSizeNAme:4240
2010-11-18 16:56:52.790 testINT[26034:a0f] val:1879919632
2010-11-18 16:56:52.791 testINT[26034:a0f] the fontSizeSegmentID is: 32767
2010-11-18 16:56:52.791 testINT[26034:a0f] fontSizeNAme:4272
2010-11-18 16:56:52.791 testINT[26034:a0f] val:1879919632
2010-11-18 16:56:52.792 testINT[26034:a0f] the fontSizeSegmentID is: 32767
2010-11-18 16:56:52.792 testINT[26034:a0f] fontSizeNAme:4304
2010-11-18 16:56:52.792 testINT[26034:a0f] val:1879919632
2010-11-18 16:56:52.793 testINT[26034:a0f] the fontSizeSegmentID is: 32767
2010-11-18 16:56:52.793 testINT[26034:a0f] fontSizeNAme:4336
2010-11-18 16:56:52.794 testINT[26034:a0f] val:1879919632
2010-11-18 16:56:52.794 testINT[26034:a0f] the fontSizeSegmentID is: 32767

Can anybody kindly explain me why? why I cast the @"22" NString and the one form int returns a different value????? Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In Objective-C, you can't just compare an int and NSString* which contains a string representation of an integer. To convert between the two, you need to do

NSString* s=@"11";
int i=[s intValue];  // i now contains 11

Also, the % specification in NSLog does not specify how you want the object to be interpreted. You need to specify the correct % thing matching with the type of the object. Otherwise it just shows you junk. So, both

NSLog(@"the current font Value1 is %i", val);
NSLog(@"the current font Value2 is %i",val2);

are illegal, because val and val2 are NSString*. Instead you need to do

NSLog(@"the current font Value1 is %@", val);
NSLog(@"the current font Value2 is %@",val2);

or

NSLog(@"the current font Value1 is %i", [val intValue]);
NSLog(@"the current font Value2 is %i",[val2 intValue]);

You can't compare two NSString*s by == either. You need to use [aString isEqualTo:anotherString].

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I agree with @Yuji, in objective C you must not attempt to compare strings with integers. You will likely end up with a wild number running into a system buffer somewhere. Or if you have a debugging method you will likely get an out of range exception.

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Actually, the program will do a comparison between the int and the pointer to your Obj-C object, which is completely valid, it will just give you non-sensical result. –  Nick Forge Nov 18 '10 at 11:48
    
I believe that is what I said. –  Michael Eakins Nov 18 '10 at 12:08
    
@Michael Eakins: Whatever you believe, that is not what you said. You said "you will likely end up with a wild number running into a system buffer... or...an out of range exception". Neither of those will happen if you compare a pointer to an int. –  JeremyP Nov 18 '10 at 14:48
    
@JeremyP Arrogance does not lend itself to the productive sharing of ideals. I do BELIEVE the what I wrote is what I wrote. –  Michael Eakins Nov 18 '10 at 17:10
    
@ Michael Eakins: I know you believe that you wrote something correct, but your belief is erroneous. You wrote that doing a comparison between a string (which is a pointer in Objective-C) and an int will cause a buffer overflow or an exception. That is a false statement regardless of the fact that you believe it to be true. –  JeremyP Nov 19 '10 at 10:24

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