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I haven't been able to find a very clear description of what's going on when using AppDomains, so hopefully someone will be able to enlighten me. I have a simple test program (basically ripped off the MSDN example):

using System;
using System.Reflection;

class Program
{
   public static void Main(string[] args)
   {            
      A localA = new A() { Name = "local" };
      localA.PrintAppDomain();

      AppDomain domain = AppDomain.CreateDomain("NewDomain");
      A remoteA = (A)domain.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap(
          Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName, "A");
      remoteA.Name = "remote";
      remoteA.PrintAppDomain();

      remoteA.PrintA(localA);
      remoteA.PrintAppDomain();
   }
}

[Serializable]
public class A : MarshalByRefObject
{
   public string Name { get; set; }

   public void PrintAppDomain()
   {
      Console.WriteLine("In AppDomain {1}", 
          this.Name, AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName);
   }

   public void PrintA(A a)
   {
      Console.WriteLine(a.ToString());
   }

   public override string ToString()
   {
      return String.Format("A : {0}", this.Name);
   }
}

When run, this prints out

In AppDomain test.exe
In AppDomain NewDomain
A : local
In AppDomain NewDomain

So... when I do remote.PrintA(localA), does this involve marshalling? Looking at the IL in Reflector suggests not, but I thought that data in one AppDomain couldn't access data from another AppDomain.

If I remove the : MarshalByRefObject from the declaration of A, the program prints

In AppDomain test.exe
In AppDomain test.exe
A : local
In AppDomain test.exe

What is happening in this case? Is a new AppDomain being created?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The behaviour you see is quite normal.

If you remove the MarshalByRefObject, since you have Serializable attribute, remoting will serialize the class for you and marshal the state to the main AppDomain. So when the method runs, in runs in the current AppDomain since it lives in the main AppDOmain (has been serialized and marshalled to current AppDomain).

If you keep MarshalByRefObject, remoting will make the call on the remote object.

If you remove both, it will throw up an exception since remoting objects need to have one.

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Argghhh, got distracted and forgot to press submit :) –  leppie Nov 18 '10 at 10:11
    
Ok, thanks. So if you leave off the MarshalByRefObject and mutate the "remote" object, are these changes marshalled across to the AppDomain? Also, why would you leave off the MarshalByRefObject? Does this provide a benefit in some scenarios? –  Graham Clark Nov 18 '10 at 10:18
1  
You would normally use only one, if you use both MarshalByRefObject will take effect. This is all remoting stuff (Pre-WCF) which is pretty old now but still used for inter-AppDomain communication. You might wanna read up on Remoting if you need more info. Answer to your question is yes, you can manipulate objects using remoting on different AppDomains, processes or machines. –  Aliostad Nov 18 '10 at 10:29

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