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I am having the following problem:

public class A {
    public A(X, Y, Z) {
    ...
    }
}

public class B : A {
    public B(X, Y) : base(X, Y) {
        //i want to instantiate Z here and only then pass it to the base class!
    }
}

How can I solve this problem? Is there a way?

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What? is B:A? If so, how can A have more data than B? Also, A doesn't seem to have such a constructor... –  Kobi Nov 18 '10 at 10:18
    
Do you mean public class B : A { in your example? –  Øyvind Bråthen Nov 18 '10 at 10:18
    
Edited original post. Yes, its B: A –  devoured elysium Nov 18 '10 at 10:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The common solution is to call a static method belonging to the type that can calculate the value of the parameter to be passed to the base constructor.

For example:

public B(int x, int y)
    : base(x, y, CalculateZ(x, y))
{

}

// You can make this parameterless if it does not depend on X and Y
private static int CalculateZ(int x, int y)
{
   //Calculate it here.

    int exampleZ = x + y;

    return exampleZ;
}

Do note that CalculateZ cannot be an instance method, because the this reference is not available in constructor initializers.

From the language-specification 10.11.1 Constructor initializers:

An instance constructor initializer cannot access the instance being created. Therefore it is a compile-time error to reference this in an argument expression of the constructor initializer, as is it a compile-time error for an argument expression to reference any instance member through a simple-name.

EDIT: Changed 'instance' to 'static' in the description.

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1  
+1, but don't you mean that it's legal to call static methods? –  LukeH Nov 18 '10 at 10:24
    
@Kobi, @LukeH: Was a brain-freeze typo; the mind thinks one thing and the fingers type another. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Ani Nov 18 '10 at 10:25

You need to calculate Z before the constructor itself gets called. If it's simple you can use an inline expression, else you'll need to define a helper function.

Using a helperfunction:

public class A {
    public A(X x, Y y, Z z) {
    ...
    }
}

public class B : A {
    private static Z calculateZ()
    {
    }

    public B(X x, Y y) : base(X, Y, calculateZ()) {

    }
}

Without helperfunction:

public B(X, Y) : base(X, Y, X+Y) {

}
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public abstract class A {
    public A(X, Y) {
    ...
    }

    public abstract Z TheVariableZ{get;set;}
}

public class B : A {
    public B(X, Y) : base(X, Y) {
        //i can only calculate Z here!
    }

    public override Z TheVariableZ{//implement it here}
}

And if you can't make A abstract, just mark the property as virtual

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3  
Calling a virtual method in a constructor is a bad idea: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182331(v=VS.100).aspx –  Fredrik Mörk Nov 18 '10 at 10:27

Possibly this:

public abstract class A {
    public A(X, Y) {
       CalculateZ();
    }

    abstract void CalculateZ();
}

public class B : A {
    public B(X, Y) : base(X, Y) {

    }

    override void CalculateZ()
   {
      ... Calculate here.
   }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Calling a virtual method in a constructor is a bad idea: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182331(v=VS.100).aspx –  Fredrik Mörk Nov 18 '10 at 10:26

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