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So, I have a web 2.0 site I'm building with a lot of user input but as with any web 2.0 site, I'm gonna have trouble with spam. Easiest way in my case as far as I'm aware is to block any HTML tags. Users do not need formatting and I'll use for fixing spacing.

But I don't think there's any blocking tags, xmb sounds perfect but been depreceated since the 90s so pretty dumb.

Otherwise, what kind of filtering would I need? I see stack overflow allows 'basic' HTML... How do I do it? Block certain tags or allow certain tags, etc. As I said, users shouldn't need any tags.

Edit: using django

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You are not specifying which server side language you are using. Seeing as this will need server side processing, that is essential –  Pekka 웃 Nov 18 '10 at 10:42
    
Info: The question is for Django –  SuperDuck Nov 18 '10 at 12:59
    
See this other post, also I use: github.com/dcollien/FilterHTML to do this sort of thing –  codedvillain Nov 3 '12 at 7:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In Django, you can escape (encode) the special HTML characters like < and > so tags can be displayed as readable text, but don't function as HTML :

from django.utils.html import escape
print escape('<div class="q">Q & A</div>')

Note that your template variables may have already been escaped, you may want to check it first to see if you need to use escape.

Or you can completely remove the tags as follows :

from django.utils.html import strip_tags
strip_tags(string_value)

Or, you can use a template filter to remove them like :

{{ value|striptags }}
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I'm using django so it could be difficult but I'm a bit of a n00b at it so ... Might be possible and I don't realize. Any ideas on how to do it in django? –  paddymelon Nov 18 '10 at 11:18
    
I've updated the answer to include how to do it on django –  SuperDuck Nov 18 '10 at 11:59
    
Sweet. Value|striptags seems perfect for how I'm using the data in the app. Thanks so much! –  paddymelon Nov 18 '10 at 19:52

If you don't want to allow any HTML, then just convert characters with special meaning to their respective entities. e.g. > to &gt; and & to &amp;. How you do this depends on the language you are processing the data with, in TT I would [% some_data | html %] while in PHP the htmlspecialchars function would come into play.

If you want to allow some content, you will need to run it through and HTML parser, check every element and attribute against a white list and then serialize it back to HTML. There are tools to help with this but, again, it depends on the language you are working in.

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I'm using django so it could be difficult but I'm a bit of a n00b at it so ... Might be possible and I don't realize. Any ideas on how to do it in django? –  paddymelon Nov 18 '10 at 11:19
    
This is better than the strip-tags answer. –  Spudley Nov 18 '10 at 12:07
    
@Spudley the other answer already contains this method, not only strip_tags(). –  SuperDuck Nov 18 '10 at 12:13
    
@SuperDuck - it didn't when I left my comment. But my point was that strip-tags removes some of the user's input. The site owner doesn't want raw html tags to be allowed, but a user may intentionally include html tags in a post to demonstrate or ask a question about some specific HTML code (as seen in many examples on this site). If you do a strip-tags, it makes it harder to ask this kind of question. –  Spudley Nov 18 '10 at 12:31
    
@Spudley : I totally agree, even commited a patch to an open source project for the very same reason. However this is included in my answer since the first post, on the 2nd paragraph, it may have been missed. –  SuperDuck Nov 18 '10 at 12:44

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