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Can I "yield" into a Map?

I've tried

val rndTrans = for (s1 <- 0 to nStates;
                    s2 <- 0 to nStates
                        if rnd.nextDouble() < trans_probability)
                            yield (s1 -> s2);

(and with , instead of ->) but I get the error

TestCaseGenerator.scala:42: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Seq.Projection[(Int, Int)]
 required: Map[State,State]
    new LTS(rndTrans, rndLabeling)

I can see why, but I can't see how to solve this :-/

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted
scala> (for(i <- 0 to 10; j <- 0 to 10) yield (i -> j)) toMap
res1: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,Int] = Map((0,10), (5,10), (10,10), (1,10), (6,10), (9,10), (2,10), (7,10), (3,10),  (8,10), (4,10))
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Hmm, probably close to what I'm looking for, but I get: error: value toMap is not a member of Seq.Projection[(Int, Int)] –  aioobe Nov 18 '10 at 11:03
    
Thats strange. Which version of Scala are you using? –  aioobe Nov 18 '10 at 11:04
    
I'm using 2.8.0.final –  Vasil Remeniuk Nov 18 '10 at 11:06
1  
Seq.Projection is deprecated in 2.8; so it should not be the result of a built-in for loop. Could you check your version again? (println(util.Properties.versionString)) –  Debilski Nov 18 '10 at 11:12
    
Yeah. I'm on 2.7 :-( when will the Ubuntu repos be updated to provide 2.8?? Thanks anyway... –  aioobe Nov 18 '10 at 11:18

An alternate solution in Scala 2.8:

Welcome to Scala version 2.8.1.r23457-b20101106033551 (Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM, Java 1.6.0_22).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> import scala.collection.breakOut            
import scala.collection.breakOut

scala> val list: List[(Int,Int)] = (for(i<-0 to 3;j<-0 to 2) yield(i->j))(breakOut)
list: List[(Int, Int)] = List((0,0), (0,1), (0,2), (1,0), (1,1), (1,2), (2,0), (2,1), (2,2), (3,0), (3,1), (3,2))

scala> val map: Map[Int,Int] = (for(i<-0 to 3;j<-0 to 2) yield(i->j))(breakOut)    
map: Map[Int,Int] = Map((0,2), (1,2), (2,2), (3,2))

scala> val set: Set[(Int,Int)] = (for(i<-0 to 3;j<-0 to 2) yield(i->j))(breakOut)
set: Set[(Int, Int)] = Set((2,2), (3,2), (0,1), (1,2), (0,0), (2,0), (3,1), (0,2), (1,1), (2,1), (1,0), (3,0))

scala> 
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4  
+1 for the ever mysterious (but useful!) breakOut. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think it affords slightly better performance because it provides a builder that allows direct generation of the map (instead of building another collection which is converted afterward). –  Nicolas Payette Nov 18 '10 at 21:01
1  
@Zwirb You are correct. And +1 because I didn't know you could use it with for/yield syntax! :-) –  Daniel C. Sobral Nov 18 '10 at 23:15

Alternative (works on 2.7):

scala> Map((for(i <- 0 to 10; j <- 0 to 10) yield (i -> j)): _*)
res0: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,Int] = Map((0,10), (5,10), (10,10), (1,10), (6,10), (9,10), (2,10), (7,10), (3,10), (8,10), (4,10))
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Great. I'm stuck with 2.7 for now, so I'll use this one. –  aioobe Nov 18 '10 at 11:19

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