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The FFTW manual says that its fftw_complex type is bit compatible to std::complex<double> class in STL. But that doesn't work for me:

#include <complex>
#include <fftw3.h>
int main()
{
   std::complex<double> x(1,0);
   fftw_complex fx;
   fx = reinterpret_cast<fftw_complex>(x);
}

This gives me an error:

error: invalid cast from type ‘std::complex<double>’ to type ‘double [2]’

What am I doing wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Re-write your code as follows:

#include <complex>
#include <fftw3.h>
int main()
{
   std::complex<double> x(1,0);
   fftw_complex fx;
   memcpy( &fx, &x, sizeof( fftw_complex ) );
}

Every compiler I've used will optimise out the memcpy because it is copying a fixed, ie at compile time, amount of data.

This avoids pointer aliasing issues.

Edit: You can also avoid strict aliasing issues using a union as follows:

#include <complex>
#include <fftw3.h>
int main()
{
   union stdfftw
   {
       std::complex< double > stdc;
       fftw_complex           fftw;
   };
   std::complex<double> x(1,0);
   stdfftw u;
   u.stdc = x;
   fftw_complex fx = u.fftw;
}

Though strictly this C99 rules (Not sure about C++) are broken as reading from a different member of a union to the one written too is undefined. It works on most compilers though. Personally I prefer my original method.

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Ok, that works for me! 3 years not coding in pure C :) Thanks a lot. –  galadog Nov 18 '10 at 12:09
    
@galadog Is the memcpy necessary? Why couldn't you do this: std::complex<double> x(1,0); fftw_complex* fx = &x –  Andre Boos Oct 22 '11 at 1:40
    
@Andre Boos: Because that breaks the strict aliasing rules ... –  Goz Oct 22 '11 at 7:36
    
what about with an array of complex numbers? –  pyCthon Sep 4 '12 at 6:20

The idea behind bit-compatibility of fftw_complex and C99 and C++ complex types is not that they can be easily created from one another, but that all functions in FFTW that take pointers to fftw_complex can also take pointers to c++ std::complex. Therefore the best approach is probably to use std::complex<> throughout your program and only convert pointers to these values when calling FFTW functions:

std::vector<std::complex<double> > a1, a2;
....
....
fftw_plan_dft(N, reinterpret_cast<fftw_complex*>(&a1[0]),
                 reinterpret_cast<fftw_complex*>(&a2[0]),
                 FFTW_FORWARD, FFTW_ESTIMATE);
....
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By far the best way to go. –  Mike Jun 25 '13 at 23:46

reinterpret_cast only works for pointers and references. So you'd have to do this:

#include <complex>
#include <fftw3.h>
int main()
{
   std::complex<double> x(1,0);
   fftw_complex fx(*reinterpret_cast<fftw_complex*>(&x));
}

This assumes that fftw_complex has a copy constructor. To avoid problems with strict aliasing, Goz's solution should be preferred.

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What you do above breaks strict aliasing rules and should be avoided. GCC will warn you for doing it and will potentially break if you have strict aliasing turned on. –  Goz Nov 18 '10 at 11:56
    
@Goz: You are right. I added a warning and referred to your answer. –  Björn Pollex Nov 18 '10 at 12:02
2  
Works for references too: fftw_complex fx(reinterpret_cast<fftw_complex&>(x)); –  MSalters Nov 19 '10 at 10:04

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