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Is there any difference between:

echo "<p>" . $var . "</p>";

and

<p> <?php echo $var; ?> </p>

when it comes to performance?

Joel

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4  
If you don't have billions of statements like this, the performance difference is probably negligible. –  Felix Kling Nov 18 '10 at 12:46
    
@close voter. This question is not localized. It just uses a simple example. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 18 '10 at 12:56
2  
This kind of micro-optimization is meaningless and a huge waste of programmer time –  stillstanding Nov 18 '10 at 13:05
    
@stillstanding So is code-golf and a lot of other questions on SO. Why would you care what are his motives? Maybe he's just curious. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 18 '10 at 13:07
    
@Alin Purcaru: Curiosity or otherwise, there's no wisdom gained when only one side is visible. We'll all be rats following the Pied Piper if we all thought the same way. –  stillstanding Nov 18 '10 at 13:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The second is slightly quicker as it doesn't have to concatenate the strings together.

But really you're only going to see an increase in performance if this is repeated a huge number of times.

Also, as a slight side point, using the multiple parameters of the echo function, such as:

echo("<p>",$var,"</p>");

is also quicker than concatenating the string.

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2  
echo is not a function, but a construct. Using () is optional. echo "<p>",$var,"</p>" works just as well, and I would recommend using it like this to differentiate from functions. Note that the code $x = echo(""); is invalid. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 18 '10 at 12:49
    
This will bite you the day you want to put this line in a variable as you will be doing some copy pasta which will fail. –  Arkh Nov 18 '10 at 13:09

Even faster is this

<p><?=$var?></p>

Using <p> <?php echo $var; ?> </p> than echo "<p>" . $var . "</p>"; reduces server side operation. Even though in this case it is neglegible, it does have a difference.

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Isn't using short-open tags bad practise? –  Nick Nov 18 '10 at 14:50
1  
@Nick, it depends on the situation. IMO, some servers don't allow short open tags by default, so the code might not execute without fixing it, thats why they might be considered bad practice. But here performance is at stake... So I think they do apply. –  Starx Nov 19 '10 at 6:10
    
alright, thank you for the clarification. –  Nick Nov 19 '10 at 7:13

This is an almost useless micro-optimization. If you are not in a very special case and you still need to squeeze some ms after the real good optimization (caching, buffers, good SQL etc.) you better start thinking about using something which is not php.

Just choose one method and stick to it so your code is readable. If you want the fastest one, benchmark it on your server as some configurations may change your results.

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I agree with @laurencek, only in case of a repeated unnatural number of times performance can be committed.

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I would recommend PHP Benchmark from Chris Vincent. Here it's documented very well. Don't forget to reload the page a few times to get a better result.

To comment the answers for shorten your version of code to <?=$var; ?>:
Always thing about interoperability. Not all webservers out there allow short tags and when you want to move your code to another server or want to publish the whole thing, it could lead to problems.

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If one has to reload the page a few times to get better results the benchmarks are flawed. –  Gordon Nov 18 '10 at 14:05
    
I think, that's the world of PHP and server thing behind it. Okay, you're right. You can read about people, who test it at their own hardware, but here you can test it yourself. I can confirm the results listed on the benchmark I linked. So it's hard to believe the whole thing is flawed. –  Johnny Dec 1 '10 at 20:38

<p> <?php echo $var; ?> </p> Is faster because

  1. the HTML part is not parsed by the PHP compiler
  2. there is no string concatenation done

Extra:

  1. 'string' is faster than "string"
  2. <?php echo $var; ?> can be shortened to <?=$var?>

Here's something to play with if you want.

<?php
$start = microtime(true);
for($i = 0; $i < 10000; $i++){
?>
<?php
echo "<p>" . rand(0,9) . "</p>";
?>
<?php
}
echo '<br /><br />TIME: '.(microtime(true) - $start);
?>

vs.

<?php
$start = microtime(true);
for($i = 0; $i < 10000; $i++){
?>
<p><?php echo rand(0,9) ?></p>
<?php
}
echo '<br /><br />TIME: '.(microtime(true) - $start);
?>

I'd like to see your times in the comments.

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1  
great, just curios, how come 'string' is faster than "string"? –  Joel Nov 18 '10 at 12:57
1  
Because "string" may contain embedded variables, like in "Hello $name!", so PHP searches for variables in it. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 18 '10 at 13:01

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