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<link type="text/css" media="all" rel="stylesheet" href="./foo.css.txt" />


Firbug Error


The stylesheet foo.css.txt was not loaded because its MIME type, "text/plain", is not "text/css".


Explanation


The browser is interpreting the CSS as a text document rather than a CSS, despite any effort to force it's MIME through the browser. Naturally, in production I will be using foo.css (w/o the txt extension), but I would think this would be possible. It works for JavaScript:

<script type="text/javascript" src="./index.js.txt"></script> 


Other Thoughts


  • Setting type="css" doesn't show an error in Firebug and the page validates, but the CSS doesn't load properly - I'm pretty sure that's not a valid MIME type though. I tried to find a list of MIME types off W3C, but as with everything it's difficult to find/understand W3C

  • This does work with other, less popular, extensions such as dat: href="./foo.css.dat"

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you use the type attribute in HTML you are saying "When you fetch this resource, expect to get this type of data." This allows user agents (such as browsers) to avoid requesting resources that they know they can't handle. For CSS you need to set this to text/css.

When the server responds to the request, the HTTP Content-Type header says "This content is of this type". It is canonical and must also be set to text/css for CSS data.

Because you have used a .txt file, the server (in a default configuration) says that the file contains data that is text/plain so it tells the browser that. You cannot override this from the browser.

It works for JavaScript

Browsers, for various reasons, tend to ignore the Content-Type specified by servers for JavaScript. This could be considered a bug in those browsers.

Setting type="css" doesn't show an error in Firebug and the page validates, but the CSS doesn't load properly - I'm pretty sure that's not a valid MIME type though

css is not a registered MIME type, the browser doesn't recognise it as a stylesheet language that it can understand, so it doesn't event try to download it.

I tried to find a list of MIME types off W3C, but as with everything it's difficult to find/understand W3C

The W3C isn't responsible for the MIME type registry, which you can find at http://www.iana.org/assignments/media-types/

share|improve this answer
    
I think the real question, which I failed to include, is: is it possible to get this to work in the HTML page I'm fairly certain I've modified the content-type in Apache for txt files in the past, but I want to see if there's a quick and easy way to add something to the "link" element. -- I'm going to test what happens when dynamically loading CSS files w/ JavaScript too. –  vol7ron Nov 18 '10 at 20:46
    
No, there isn't anything quick and easy you can add to the link element, as I said: "You cannot override this from the browser." –  Quentin Nov 18 '10 at 20:49

If you could use .php instead of .txt you could set type from within the file itself.

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(see the comment I left for RDL) –  vol7ron Nov 18 '10 at 20:43
    
Okay. The only other way I can think of is changing the handling of files via Apache, but you state you want to stay away from that. –  Damien Nov 19 '10 at 13:40
    
Yes, to stay away from any special configuration for txt files :) This is merely an exercise not a production case. –  vol7ron Nov 26 '10 at 15:50

Try using a server side extension like .php

In this case you can set the mime-type in the document itself.

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This isn't to get it to get something to work, this is to get it to work with ".txt" w/o changing the server config. –  vol7ron Nov 18 '10 at 20:42

In case anyone still wants to do this, it can be done with JavaScript. Here's a rough jQuery solution:

var sheet = $('<style></style>')
$('head').append(sheet)
sheet.load("./foo.css.txt")
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting example - retrieve the file as text and build the STYLE element around it. It's been a while, but I think the reason I was doing this was to quickly debug/browse js/css files w/o changing any OS file type association. That way the OS might still execute a js file, but would open a js.txt in something like notepad. The CSS was probably for consistency. –  vol7ron May 16 '12 at 14:26

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