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I find myself doing the following a lot to define return values from ruby methods:

def foo
  val = (some expression)
  val
end

This always seems a bit contrived. What's the best practice here?

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This is tooooo subjective. Ruby allows you place returning value at the last line in method — you can use it. Sometimes you can't use it. Sometimes you don't want to use it. You can do as you like... The is no BEST practice. –  Nakilon Nov 18 '10 at 15:38
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6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It is unnecessary to save it to a variable unless (some expression) is heavy and will be called multiple times. In that case you might want to cache it.

I would go with either:

def foo
  (some expression)
end

or for caching:

def foo
  @val ||= (some expression)
end
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Thanks for this answer, it's exactly correct. –  Kevin Bedell Nov 18 '10 at 15:46
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Note that as of Ruby 1.9 you can use Object#tap to save a value for the return at the end if you need to do something else with the value before returning it:

def foo
  (some expression).tap do |val|
    # use val here
  end
  # The return value of the tap is _val_
  # and hence the return value of your method
end
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Interesting. Thanks for the note. –  Kevin Bedell Nov 20 '10 at 15:51
    
Yeah indeed interesting, but I never saw it as real implementation –  Markus Graf Jul 30 '13 at 13:19
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As long as your last expression evaluates to the desired one you want to return, you're safe.

def foo
  val = (some expression)
end

is identical to the one in the question as it evaluates to (some expression), just like val would.

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1  
def foo ; (some expression) end –  Nakilon Nov 18 '10 at 15:37
    
@Nakilon In its shortest form, yes. Only Kevin knows what he wants to do inside his functions. :) –  pestaa Nov 18 '10 at 15:38
    
Thanks to you both. I know this is a simple question, but I appreciate you're taking time to clarify. Thanks! –  Kevin Bedell Nov 18 '10 at 15:46
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I personally like using return to explicitly call out what is being returned. It's extra code that Ruby doesn't require you to use, but it helps me with readability. It also allows you to have multiple exit points in your method since execution of your method will stop as soon as return is called.

This really isn't much different from the example you gave in your original question.

def foo
  val = (some expression)
  val
end

could look like

def foo
  return (some expression)
end
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Temporary variables are evil because they increase connascence.

http://www.mgroves.com/what-is-connascence

ReplaceTempWithQuery is a refactoring I use a lot:

def discount_price
  base_price = quantity * item_price
  if (base_price > 1000)
    base_price * 0.95
  else
    base_price * 0.98
  end
end

Code after refactoring:

def discount_price
  if (base_price > 1000)
    base_price * 0.98
  else
    base_price * 0.98
  end
end

def base_price
  quantity * item_price
end

http://www.refactoring.com/catalog/replaceTempWithQuery.html

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3  
The downside to doing this is you exchange a temporary variable which will fall out of scope and be garbage-collected, with two calls to recompute the value: The first to do the initial test, and the second to return the adjusted value. It's an attempt to simplify but ends up increasing the complexity and probably takes longer. –  the Tin Man Nov 18 '10 at 17:47
1  
And, BTW, you might want to try running your examples. The first has a syntax error because it's missing a closing end and the second doesn't return the right value for the if. –  the Tin Man Nov 18 '10 at 17:50
    
Thanks for pointing out the missing end. –  Petrik de Heus Nov 18 '10 at 18:51
1  
If base_price really is a bottleneck for calling discount_price you can always optimize it later on (like caching discount_price instead of inlining base_price, which helps more if discount_price is called more than once). Otherwise it's just premature optimization. The example given (which I copied from Fowler) might not be the most convincing example because the original method is still very simple. I would still refactor it if the query method (in this case base_price) is part of the domain model, which in my experience is the case most of time. –  Petrik de Heus Nov 18 '10 at 18:53
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I sometimes do what you have in your question.

Some cases where I do it are:

  1. When I'm doing imperitive programming (foo = Foo.new; foo.modify_state; foo)
  2. If I want to validate an object before returning, but as Phrogz mentioned, Object#tap may help here (foo = new_foo; raise if foo.empty?; foo)
  3. When I want to make it clear that I'm returning a variable, rather than doing more stuff (do_this; do_that; do_other_thing; result #done!)

It may indicate code smells though, such as in case 1.

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Thanks for the comment. –  Kevin Bedell Nov 20 '10 at 15:54
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