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Can someone tell me why this won't work?

var top = 0;
for (divToPosition in $('.positionableDiv')) {
   divToPosition.css('top',top+'px');
   top = top + 30;
}
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What's it doing (or not doing)? –  Michael Todd Nov 18 '10 at 15:50
    
Never enters the loop –  Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 15:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The first reason would be the misuse of the for loop.

jQuery has an idiom for looping over selected elements..

var top = 0;
$('.positionableDiv').each(function() {
   $(this).css('top',top+'px');
   top = top + 30;
});

Please take a look at for...in for a better understanding of the way a for...in loop works in javascript, it does not enumerate in the same way as say .NET or Java.

From Article:

Although it may be tempting to use this as a way to iterate over an Array, this is a bad idea.

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2  
thanks for pointing out my mis-use of javascript looping, you just saved me some hurt –  Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 16:02

The correct way to iterate over a set of matched elements is with .each, as other answers have mentioned. Attempting to use a for..in loop will iterate over the properties of the jQuery object, not the elements it matched.

To improve slightly on some of the other .each examples, you could omit the top variable to clean things up a little. The first parameter to .each is in the index of the element within the set of matched elements; you could achieve the same thing by multiplying it by 30 at each step. There is no incrementing and no top variable cluttering things up:

$('.positionableDiv').each(function(i) {
    $(this).css('top', (i * 30) + "px");
});
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@meager-- Nice! –  Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 16:11

This would work:

var top = 0;
for (var pdiv in $('.positionableDiv').get()) {
   $(pdiv).css('top', top + 'px');
   top = top + 30;
}

Basically, you use get() to retrieve the array of elements.

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The $('.positionableDiv') in your statement is a jQuery object with a great many properties. What you want is to iterate through the matched elements which is not done that way.

Try:

var top = 0;
$('.positionableDiv').css('top', function(index, value) {
    var cTop = top;
    top = top + 30;
    return cTop + 'px';
});
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As Quintin states, the use of the .each() method is a more general way of iterating over a collection of matched elements. The .css() method provides a way to process using a callback function directly, so I demonstrated that as above. Possibly slightly less clear in this case, due to the variable in play being set after the value needing to be returned. –  Orbling Nov 18 '10 at 15:57
    
I appreciate the alternative you provided, always good to know all options- Thanks –  Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 16:06
    
@Yarin Which method is the more appropriate depends upon the situation at hand. jQuery excels at making code terse and clear, so it is nice to see a number of similar but alternate methods proposed. –  Orbling Nov 18 '10 at 16:09
1  
Why I love SO –  Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 16:13

The "for (var key in obj)" is suitable for iterating the members of an object. It works for native JavaScript arrays as long as their prototype is not extended. A jQuery object may look as a native JavaScript array but it is not hence "for ( in )" fails.

You can use .each to iterate over a jQuery object: var top = 0;

$('.positionableDiv').each(function() {
     $(this).css('top', top);
     top += 30;
});
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1  
Moreover, even if it was an Array you wouldn't want to be using for-in, as @Quintin points out... and I just found out –  Yarin Nov 18 '10 at 16:08

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