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I often find myself writing R scripts that generate a lot of output. I find it cleaner to put this output into it's own directory(s). What I've written below will check for the existence of a directory and move into it, or create the directory and then move into it. Is there a better way to approach this?

mainDir <- "c:/path/to/main/dir"
subDir <- "outputDirectory"

if (file.exists(subDir)){
    setwd(file.path(mainDir, subDir))
} else {
    dir.create(file.path(mainDir, subDir))
    setwd(file.path(mainDir, subDir))

}
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I'm sure I've seen an R function that creates a temporary directory with a randomly generated name and returns the name. I think there's a similar one that creates a temp file. I can't find them offhand, but the Databel package (cran.r-project.org/web/packages/DatABEL/index.html) has a function get_temporary_file_name. –  PaulHurleyuk Nov 18 '10 at 19:37
3  
You should never use setwd() in R code - it basically defeats the idea of using a working directory because you can no longer easily move your code between computers. –  hadley Nov 20 '10 at 23:44
3  
@hadley interesting topic to ponder, I'd appreciate your thoughts on other methods to the same end. At work, all computers are sync'd to the same network so file paths are consistent. If they aren't, we have bigger issues to deal with than portability of a script. In this particular example, I was writing a script that would be loaded on a machine that will be carried around our national parks for 2 years. This script will grab data from a local SQL instance, do some processing, and spit out a .csv. The end product will be a .bat file that the end user will never have to modify. –  Chase Nov 22 '10 at 4:20
    
@Chase But you don't need to setwd to work with network paths. You just need to provide paths to save results and still work with current path (that one that is established when R session started). Or start R with desire working directory. –  Marek Nov 29 '10 at 22:17
1  
Yep. Or parametrize out_dir <- "path/to/output/directory" and then use write.table(file = file.path(out_dir,"table_1.csv"), ...). Or even out_file <- function(fnm) file.path("path/to/output/directory", fnm) and then write.table(file = out_file("table_1.csv"), ...) (similar method I use when working with network drives). –  Marek Nov 29 '10 at 22:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 72 down vote accepted

Use showWarnings = FALSE:

dir.create(file.path(mainDir, subDir), showWarnings = FALSE)
setwd(file.path(mainDir, subDir))

dir.create() does not crash if the directory already exists, it just prints out a warning. So if you can live with seeing warnings, there is no problem with just doing this:

dir.create(file.path(mainDir, subDir))
setwd(file.path(mainDir, subDir))
share|improve this answer
7  
Be aware when using showWarnings = FALSE that this will also hide other warnings such as the directory being uncreateable. –  zelanix Jan 19 at 22:12

In terms of general architecture I would recommend the following structure with regard to directory creation. This will cover most potential issues and any other issues with directory creation will be detected by the dir.create call.

mainDir <- "~"
subDir <- "outputDirectory"

if (file.exists(paste(mainDir, subDir, "/", sep = "/", collapse = "/"))) {
    cat("subDir exists in mainDir and is a directory")
} else if (file.exists(paste(mainDir, subDir, sep = "/", collapse = "/"))) {
    cat("subDir exists in mainDir but is a file")
    # you will probably want to handle this separately
} else {
    cat("subDir does not exist in mainDir - creating")
    dir.create(file.path(mainDir, subDir))
}

if (file.exists(paste(mainDir, subDir, "/", sep = "/", collapse = "/"))) {
    # By this point, the directory either existed or has been successfully created
    setwd(file.path(mainDir, subDir))
} else {
    cat("subDir does not exist")
    # Handle this error as appropriate
}

Also be aware that if ~/foo doesn't exist then a call to dir.create('~/foo/bar') will fail unless you specify recursive = TRUE.

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To find out if a path is a valid directory try:

file.info(cacheDir)[1,"isdir"]

file.info does not care about a slash on the end.

file.exists on Windows will fail for a directory if it ends in a slash, and succeeds without it. So this cannot be used to determine if a path is a directory.

file.exists("R:/data/CCAM/CCAMC160b_echam5_A2-ct-uf.-5t05N.190to240E_level1000/cache/")
[1] FALSE

file.exists("R:/data/CCAM/CCAMC160b_echam5_A2-ct-uf.-5t05N.190to240E_level1000/cache")
[1] TRUE

file.info(cacheDir)["isdir"]
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