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Are class methods and methods in the eigenclass (or metaclass) of that class just two ways to define one thing?

Otherwise, what are the differences?

class X
  # class method
  def self.a
    "a"
  end

  # eigenclass method
  class << self
    def b
      "b"
    end
  end
end

Do X.a and X.b behave differently in any way?

I recognize that I can overwrite or alias class methods by opening the eigenclass:

irb(main):031:0> class X; def self.a; "a"; end; end
=> nil
irb(main):032:0> class X; class << self; alias_method :b, :a; end; end
=> #<Class:X>
irb(main):033:0> X.a
=> "a"
irb(main):034:0> X.b
=> "a"
irb(main):035:0> class X; class << self; def a; "c"; end; end; end
=> nil
irb(main):036:0> X.a
=> "c"
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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The two methods are equivalent. The 'eigenclass' version is helpful for using the attr_* methods, for example:

class Foo
  @instances = []
  class << self;
    attr_reader :instances
  end
  def initialize
    self.class.instances << self
  end
end

2.times{ Foo.new }
p Foo.instances
#=> [#<Foo:0x2a3f020>, #<Foo:0x2a1a5c0>]

You can also use define_singleton_method to create methods on the class:

Foo.define_singleton_method :bim do "bam!" end
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1  
This is a really brilliant answer on singletons –  New Alexandria Sep 13 '13 at 15:24

In Ruby there really are no such things as class methods. Since everything is an object in Ruby (including classes), when you say def self.class_method, you are just really defining a singleton method on the instance of the class Class. So to answer your question, saying

class X
  def self.a
    puts "Hi"
  end

  class << self
    def b
      puts "there"
    end
  end
end

X.a # => Hi
X.b # => there

is two ways of saying the same thing. Both these methods are just singeton (eigen, meta, ghost, or whatever you want to call them) methods defined in the instance of your Class object, which in your example was X. This topic is part of metaprogramming, which is a fun topic, that if you have been using Ruby for a while, you should check out. The Pragmatic Programmers have a great book on metaprogramming that you should definitely take a look at if you interested in the topic.

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1  
Disagree on the "No such thing as class method". Smalltalk has been around for far longer, and is also pure OO and they use class method terminology all the time. Saying class method is less confusing than 'singleton' since the latter is a design pattern and not an attribute of a language. –  Syed Ali Sep 13 '12 at 8:20
1  
I might get an award for necromancy here, but I strongly agree on "no such thing as class method". If you define a method on an object's eigenclass, and that object is an instance of Dog, you don't call that method a dog method. –  ggPeti May 1 at 23:31

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