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$a = array(8, 16, 16, 32, 8, 8, 4, 4);

With an array like the one above is there a way so I can divide/split the array based on the value suming up to a set value. e.g if I wanted them to equal 32. My final array will have upto 100 values all being either 32, 16, 8 or 4 and I just need to group the items so the value always equal a set amount so in this example its 32.

From the above array I would would hope to get:

$a[0][1] = 16
$a[0][2] = 16

$a[1][3] = 32

$a[2][0] = 8
$a[2][4] = 8
$a[2][5] = 8
$a[2][6] = 4
$a[2][7] = 4

as $a[0] sums up to 32 and so does $a[1] and $a[2].

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2  
why would you get [[16,16],[32],[8,8,8,4,4]] and not, as an example, [[32], [8,8,16], [4,4,8,16]]? Or does it not matter? –  Matt Ellen Nov 18 '10 at 16:24
    
ow it doesnt matter what the groups are made up of as long as they sum to 32 sorry for the confusion. –  SubstanceD Nov 18 '10 at 16:27
    
Seconded - does it matter how they're combined as long as it totals 32? Also what to do if the total isn't a multiple of 32? –  Spudley Nov 18 '10 at 16:30
    
looks similar to a magic square: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_square –  stillstanding Nov 18 '10 at 16:31
    
if there is an excess that doesnt multiply it would be nice hjust to see it in a seperate element at the end. But yes your completely rigth it doesnt matter which of the items its groups as long as they sum to 32. Ideally the more random the groupings was the bettrer as the values are sizes of adverts in a newspaper. –  SubstanceD Nov 18 '10 at 16:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
$a = array(8, 16, 16, 32, 8, 8, 4, 4);
$limit = 32;
rsort($a);
$b = array(array());
$index = 0;
foreach($a as $i){
    if($i+array_sum($b[$index]) > $limit){
        $b[++$index] = array();
    }
    $b[$index][] = $i;
}
$a = $b;
print_r($a);

It will work, but only because in your case you have 4 | 8 | 16 | 32, and only if the needed sum is a multiple of the biggest number (32).

Test: http://codepad.org/5j5nl3dT

Note: | means divides.

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| is a bitwise operator meaning OR, why did you just not do 4 / 8 / 16 / 32 ? –  RobertPitt Nov 18 '10 at 16:41
    
@Robert I was referring to the | used in Math. Sorry if it created confusion. By using that chaining I tried to point out that each number divides the next one. 4 / 8 / 16 / 32 just equals O it doesn't tell you anything more. –  Alin Purcaru Nov 18 '10 at 16:45
    
No problems, a lot of members get confused with Bitwise Operators including myself at times, just making sure that there's no confusion, great block of code aswell :) +1 –  RobertPitt Nov 18 '10 at 16:51
$a = array(8, 16, 16, 32, 8, 8, 4, 4);
$group_limit = 32;


$current_group = $result = array();
$cycles_since_successful_operation = 0;

while ($a && $cycles_since_successful_operation < count($a))
{
    array_push($current_group,array_shift($a));

    if (array_sum($current_group) > $group_limit)
        array_push($a,array_pop($current_group));
    elseif (array_sum($current_group) < $group_limit)
        $cycles_since_successful_operation = 0;
    elseif (array_sum($current_group) == $group_limit)
    {
        $result []= $current_group;
        $current_group = array();
        $cycles_since_successful_operation = 0;
    }
}
if ($a)
    $result []= $a; // Remaining elements form the last group

http://codepad.org/59wmsi4g

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function split_into_thirtytwos($input_array) {
  $output_array=array();
  $work_array=array();
  $sum=0;
  sort($input_array,SORT_NUMERIC);
  while(count($input_array)>0) {
    $sum=array_sum($work_array)+$input_array[count($input_array)-1];
    if($sum<=32) {
        $work_array[]=array_pop($input_array);
    } else {
      $output_array[]=$work_array;
      $work_array=array();
    }
  }
  if(count($work_array)>0) {$output_array[]=$work_array;}
  return $output_array;
}

Tested with your input:

Array
(
  [0] => Array
    (
        [0] => 32
    )

  [1] => Array
    (
        [0] => 16
        [1] => 16
    )

  [2] => Array
    (
        [0] => 8
        [1] => 8
        [2] => 8
        [3] => 4
        [4] => 4
    )

)
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