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I have a function that does xml parsing. I want to make the function thread safe, but also as optimized (less blocking) as possible.
In short code is something as follows:

public Document doXML(InputStream s)
{
//Some processing.
  DocumentBuilderFactory factory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
  DocumentBuilder parser = factory.newDocumentBuilder();
  Document xmlDoc = parser.parse(is);
  return xmlDoc;

}

But I do not want to create a new DocumentBuilderFactory or DocumentBuilder in each call.
I want to reuse factory and parser, but I am not sure they are thread-safe. So what is the most optimal approach?
1) Cache a DocumentBuilderFactory in a class field and synchronize the factory.newDocumentBuilder(); so that each thread has its own instance of DocumentBuilder
2) Cache a DocumentBuilderFactory and DocumentBuilder and synchronize parser.parse(is); per thread
I think (2) is best, but is it safe to do it? Also can I avoid blocking by synchronized? I would like it to be as fast as possible.

Thanks?

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I am not very sure. In this code sample, you no need to use synchronized method. Since, there is no shared Object to protect your resource. If you have any shared common object, you have to synchronize them in order to exclusive mutually. –  Mohamed Saligh Nov 18 '10 at 16:51
    
@Mohamed Saligh:I want to make DocumentBuilder and DocumentBuilderFactory shared. Right now, you are right there is no issue –  Cratylus Nov 18 '10 at 17:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you are reusing thread (as in a thread pool) you can declare your DocumentBuilderFactory to be thread local. There is the overhead of creating a new set for each thread, but as I said, if you are reuising the subsequent overhead is very low.

final ThreadLocal<DocumentBuilderFactory> documentBuilderFactor = new ThreadLocal<DocumentBuilderFactory>(){
     public DocumentBuilderFactory  initialValue(){
       return  DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
     }
}

public Document doXML(InputStream s)
{
//Some processing.
  DocumentBuilderFactory factory = documentBuilderFactor.get();
  DocumentBuilder parser = factory.newDocumentBuilder();
  Document xmlDoc = parser.parse(is);
  return xmlDoc;

}

Here you will only create one DocumentBuilderFactory for each thread.

I dont know if DocumentBuilder is thread safe when parsing (is it immutable?). But if DocumentBuilder is thread-safe when parsing you can use the same mechanism as I stated.

This resolution would make the overall throughput as fast as possible.

Note: This wasnt tested or compiled just gives an idea of what I am referring to.

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@John V.:I am supposed to provide this function (along with others). Threads will call this function, but I have no control of how/when those threads are created(is not my part). So I can not know if threads will be reused or not. So if threads are not reused, the code is equivalent to my original post? –  Cratylus Nov 18 '10 at 17:33
    
Yes, you are correct. If you are not reusing threads then the overhead of using a ThreadLocal with the new dom factory creation would be a bit high. Then again starting new threads each time I think is a bigger problem :) –  John Vint Nov 18 '10 at 17:36
    
@John V.: You are right!But if they are pooling threads and I use thread local, may be there will be leaks? Check this out: weblogs.java.net/blog/jjviana/archive/2010/06/09/… –  Cratylus Nov 18 '10 at 17:38
1  
The ThreadLocal itself can be static, if you want each Thread under all circumstances to use the same DocumentBuilderFactory which makes sense here. –  John Vint Nov 18 '10 at 21:26
1  
@shadesco It depends on the number of worker threads you have running on your app. A normal web application will have many worker threads. For your example, if you have 3 different users it is likely you will have 3 different factories. However, only n number of factories will ever be created for an application with n worker threads. So if your app has only 1 worker thread then yes, there will only be one DocumentBuilderFactory. –  John Vint Jan 22 '12 at 6:23

2) would be thread safe but your app will only ever be able to parse one doc at a time.

Why not just use the code you have? Does

DocumentBuilderFactory factory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
DocumentBuilder parser = factory.newDocumentBuilder();

have a demonstrably unacceptable overhead?

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With light testing, I do not see a problem. But I am not sure if it will get worse depending on load. From reading, my understanding is that creating a factory is too expensive. I think this stands for DocumentBuilder as well. So I was wondering if this code will eventually display poor performance –  Cratylus Nov 18 '10 at 17:08
    
Creating a factory does have some overhead, but it is probably insignificant when compared to reading from the stream and parsing the doc. Most of the overhead seems to be finding the name of the implementation class by checking a system property, jaxb.properties (which it only does once and caches anyway) and lastly in META-INF/services. You can reduce the overhead by giving it an implementation class name. –  Qwerky Nov 19 '10 at 11:35
    
Interesting. But how do I know the implementation class?You are suggesting something similar to John M's answer, right? How do I know the class name that will be available in the runtime my code will run?Can you explain it to me please??? –  Cratylus Nov 19 '10 at 20:03

If you want to avoid synchronized blocking you should make sure you use atomic operations. Behavior of javax.xml.parser.* depends on implementation (you can specify the implementation using system properties, or call the implementing code). Depending on the threads count, and the load weight for each thread, it may be reasonable to control parser object creation. You should choose between a new parser creation or waiting for a parser. The code can create a pool of parsers when it starts, and then threads get parsers from the pool, which blocks when there is no free parser. Once a thread acquired a parser, it parses data, resets the parser and puts back to the pool. You can always control time/memory usage by the length of the pool.

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@khachik:Could you please elaborate more on "make sure you use atomic operations". I am not sure what you mean, and how to do it to avoid blocking –  Cratylus Nov 18 '10 at 17:04
    
@user384706 Well, "atomic" is not the best word for XML parsing, since it may be confusing (generally atomic refers to operation which can be done atomically at hardware layer (Compare-And-Swap). The first sentence means, that you cannot use the same parser in two threads without blocking one of them. So it should make sure that a parser is used in one thread only. –  khachik Nov 18 '10 at 17:10
    
@khachik:But how can I determint the size of the pool?My understanding is that the best number of threads is numberOfProcessors+1. Is this the correct size for my pool? –  Cratylus Nov 18 '10 at 20:27
    
Create DocumentBuilderFactory instance once, and use it to create parsers for threads before starting them. You don't need a pool in that case. –  khachik Nov 18 '10 at 20:30
    
@khachik:Ok, but this way I will have the overhead of parser creation.With the pool you suggested, I avoid this overhead –  Cratylus Nov 18 '10 at 20:42

I ran into some performance problems in a similar situation. I was creating the factory objects on each use to avoid thread problems (10's per second). The XML implementation in that (admittedly old) platform did some relatively slow lookup logic for a service-provider class.

My tuning was to determine the answer that resulted and configure it via command-line properties. That caused the lookup to be skipped.

-Djavax.xml.parsers.DocumentBuilderFactory=com.example.FactoryClassName
-Djavax.xml.transform.TransformerFactory=com.example.OtherFactoryClassName

The frustrating thing was that the lookup code had caching logic if a class was found. But no caching of a miss (nothing found, use default). Slightly better lookup caching that handled the negative case would have made this unneeded.

Is this still needed? Requires testing in your environment. I used truss on Solaris to notice the very frequent file operations resulting from that lookup logic.

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This "trick" works only in a specific platform, right?How do I know what is the actual implementation class of factory, in the machine my code will run? –  Cratylus Nov 18 '10 at 20:26
    
In my case, I figured out the default answer by reading the source code. But the first step would be to confirm if you did have a trouble like this (lookup happening + frequently enough that you care). No use hard-coding something like this unless you're getting some real benefit. –  John M Nov 19 '10 at 22:30
    
Do you have a suggestion on benchmarking this issue to see if I need something like you suggest? –  Cratylus Nov 22 '10 at 10:11
    
Have you profiled your app? Is this method near the top of expensive methods? It's not worth bothering with (initially) if this method is 0.1% of the runtime your profiler shows you. –  John M Nov 30 '10 at 16:04

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