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If I apply an arbitrary number of manipulators to a stream, is there a way to undo the application of those manipulators in a generic way?

For example, consider the following:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "Hello" << hex << 42 << "\n";
    // now i want to "roll-back" cout to whatever state it was in
    // before the code above, *without* having to know 
    // what modifiers I added to it

    // ... MAGIC HAPPENS! ...

    cout << "This should not be in hex: " << 42 << "\n";
}

Suppose I want to add code at MAGIC HAPPENS that will revert the state of the stream manipulators to whatever it was before I did cout << hex. But I don't know what manipulators I added. How can I accomplish this?

In other words, I'd like to be able to write something like this (psudocode/fantasy code):

std::something old_state = cout.current_manip_state();
cout << hex;
cout.restore_manip_state(old_state);

Is this possible?

EDIT:

In case you're curious, I'm interested in doing this in a custom operator<<() I'm writing for a complex type. The type is a kind of discriminated union, and different value types will have different manips applied to the stream.

EDIT2:

Restriction: I cannot use Boost or any other 3rd party libraries. Solution must be in standard C++.

share|improve this question
    
Saving and restoring all of a stream's state is quite elaborate. There's a state saver for streams by James Kanze out there somewhere on the web. (In general, when you need to know something about streams that isn't answered in Langer & Kreft, try to find a statement by James Kanze or Dietmar Kühl. They're definitive.) – sbi Nov 18 '10 at 21:53
    
"I cannot use Boost or any other 3rd party libraries." Why not? – curiousguy Nov 19 '11 at 18:56
    
@curiousguy: It's too much to go in to in any depth in a comment, but long story short, we simply don't use Boost in our production environment. Basically, it's more than we want to maintain. – John Dibling Nov 21 '11 at 17:00
    
Boost is (a) huge, (b) monolithic, (c) distributed as a tarball instead of in one of the many sensible ways that have been developed since Boost's inception. – Ian Ni-Lewis Nov 12 '15 at 14:49
    
@IanNi-Lewis: To be fair, on many Linux distros (RH, Ubuntu are 2 examples), there are packages you can install fairly simply from the package manager. – John Dibling Nov 16 '15 at 18:48
up vote 42 down vote accepted

Yes.

You can save the state and restore it:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

int main()
{

    std::ios  state(NULL);
    state.copyfmt(std::cout);

    cout << "Hello" << hex << 42 << "\n";
    // now i want to "roll-back" cout to whatever state it was in
    // before the code above, *without* having to know what modifiers I added to it

  // ... MAGIC HAPPENS! ...

    std::cout.copyfmt(state);
    cout << "This should not be in hex: " << 42 << "\n";
}

If you want to get back to the default state you don't even need to save the state you can extract it from a temporary object.

std::cout.copyfmt(std::ios(NULL));
share|improve this answer
    
": Does copyfmt include all of the flags specified by @Charles' answer below? – John Dibling Feb 4 '11 at 23:39
    
@John Dibling: Don't have my standard here. But according to this copyfmt it copies everything but the state flags. Which includes (format flags/prec/width and a few other things) – Loki Astari Feb 5 '11 at 0:56

The standard manipulators all manipulate a stream's format flags, precision and width settings. The width setting is reset by most formatted output operations anyway. These can all be retrieved like this:

std::ios_base::fmtflags saveflags = std::cout.flags();
std::streamsize prec = std::cout.precision();
std::streamsize width = std::cout.width();

and restored:

std::cout.flags( saveflags );
std::cout.precision( prec );
std::cout.width( width );

Turning this into an RAII class is an exercise for the reader...

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 for mentioning RAII – fredoverflow Nov 18 '10 at 18:02

Boost IO State saver might be of help.

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_40_0/libs/io/doc/ios_state.html

share|improve this answer
    
+1 good suggestion, alas I can't use boost in my particular environment – John Dibling Nov 18 '10 at 17:38
1  
Ok. I think this is a pure header only file, you will need to track the linked headers, but I think it is about 3-4 headers. So worth a try. Otherwise, I suspect you will have to keep track of the individual modifiers and then restore them. – Naveen Nov 18 '10 at 17:45

Saving and restoring state is not exception-safe. I would propose to shuffle everything into a stringstream, and finally you put that on the real stream (which has never changed its flags at all).

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{
    std::ostringstream out;
    out << "Hello" << std::hex << 42 << "\n";
    std::cout << out.str();

    // no magic necessary!

    std::cout << "This should not be in hex: " << 42 << "\n";
}

Of course this is a little less performant. The perfect solutions depends on your specific needs.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 good suggestion. alas this code will be called perhaps 5 million times per second, so i'd rather not construct a new stream :) – John Dibling Nov 18 '10 at 18:25

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