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I'm somewhat new to .Net, so go easy on me ;-). Anyway.

I working on my first WP7 library project which I hope will be compatible with both XNA and SilverLight applications. Based on whether I'm in XNA or Silverlight one of my factory classes needs to load different config class. Whats the best way to determine this at runtime, from a library.

I know I could do this with the "SILVERLIGHT+WINDOWS_PHONE" preprocessor directives at compile time. But that would mean building two DLLs, which isn't ideal.

~Sniff

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suspect that the information you're looking for can be found in the Environment.Version property or in the OperatingSystem.Version property.

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This lead me in the right direction. Thanks. Environment.OSVersion was what I needed. On WP7 it returns (Microsoft Windows CE 7.0..). And on XBox it returns something with Xbox. In my case I was incorrect in thinking I need to know which framework I was on, as a coworker pointed out I only need to know which OS I was on. Thanks again. –  eSniff Nov 18 '10 at 21:29

The best I could think of is setting up your library like so:

[Conditional(#XNA),
 Conditional(#WINDOWS_PHONE)]
public void DoSomeWork()
{
    var x = null;
    x = DoSomeXNAWork();
    x = DoSomeWP7Work();

    if (x != null)
    {
        ...
    }
}

[Conditional(#XNA)]
private ?? DoSomeXNAWork()
{
    return ??;
}

[Conditional(#WINDOWS_PHONE)]
private ?? DoSomeWP7Work()
{
    return ??;
}

Then, just make sure the project referencing this library has the directive set. Kind of like how Microsoft uses the Debug conditional classes such Debug.WriteLine(...). I'm not sure how you could get it to use 2 different config files. I'm sure there is a way because when you create a new Web Project (ASP.NET) there is a config file that is split into Web.Debug.config and Web.Release.config. I couldn't find an answer as to how to do it outside of ASP.NET though.

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Not the best answer in my case, but this is cool stuff!!! –  eSniff Nov 18 '10 at 21:30

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