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what I have is a text file that is like this:

apple|2  
turkey|4  
mango|11  
apple|3  
turkey|4  
mango|4  

I need the results to be:

apple|5  
turkey|8  
mango|15  

Any tips or suggestions? I know that there is some Math.Abs and such, I'm just not sure how to combine the lines. Any help would be awesome.

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3  
Is this homework-related? –  Steve Townsend Nov 18 '10 at 18:29
2  
What have you tried already? –  Matt Brunell Nov 18 '10 at 18:30
    
@Steve, if it isn't, it's an incredibly strange application. –  Moo-Juice Nov 18 '10 at 18:30
3  
@Moo-Juice - a shopping list for Thanksgiving in Hawaii perhaps? –  Steve Townsend Nov 18 '10 at 18:31
3  
The mango-to-apple ratio is off, I would go with 5:8. –  RedFilter Nov 18 '10 at 18:34

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted
File.WriteAllLines(
    "test.txt",
    File.ReadLines("test.txt")
        .Select(line => line.Split('|'))
        .Select(tokens => new
        {
            Value = int.Parse(tokens[1]),
            Text = tokens[0]
        })
        .GroupBy(li => li.Text)
        .Select(g => string.Format("{0}|{1}", g.Key, g.Sum(l => l.Value)))
        .ToArray()
);

or if you prefer:

File.WriteAllLines(
    "test.txt",
    (from lineItem in
        from line in File.ReadLines("test.txt")
        let tokens = line.Split('|')
        select new
        {
            Value = int.Parse(tokens[1]),
            Text = tokens[0]
        }
    group lineItem by lineItem.Text into g
    let sum = g.Sum(x => x.Value)
    select string.Format("{0}|{1}", g.Key, sum)).ToArray()
);
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1  
+1 for the 1 line solution :D –  McKay Nov 18 '10 at 18:43
    
Told you there was a nice way to do it in LINQ. –  Steve Townsend Nov 18 '10 at 18:44

Untested:

var lines = File.ReadLines(sourcePath);
var totals = lines.Select(line => line.Split('|'))
                  .Select(line => new { 
                      Item = line[0],
                      Count = Int32.Parse(line[1]) 
                  })
                  .GroupBy(x => x.Item)
                  .Select(g => new {
                      Item = g.Key,
                      Count = g.Sum(x => x.Count) 
                  });

File.WriteAllLines(
    destinationPath,
    totals.Select(total => String.Format("{0}|{1}", total.Item, total.Count)
);

You obviously need to make it more robust, but I am pretty sure that this a. compiles and b. produces the desired results.

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2  
why not roll it all into one line of code? :D –  McKay Nov 18 '10 at 18:36
    
@McKay: Because then it becomes an unreadable morass of code. :-) –  Jason Nov 18 '10 at 18:39
1  
Hehe, I was joking. But in all seriousness, I think Linq in this case makes it harder to make more robust. Error checking in the middle of the linq statements would make things messier. –  McKay Nov 18 '10 at 18:42

The LINQ solutions are elegant, but with text files, I prefer a little error checking.

string filePath = @"c:\temp\test.txt";
string line; 

Dictionary<string, int> dictAcculumator = new Dictionary<string,int>();

if (File.Exists( filePath ))
{
    using (StreamReader file = new StreamReader( filePath )){
        try
        {
            while ((line = file.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                if (line.Contains('|')){
                    string[] items = line.Split('|');
                    int count;
                    string item = items[1];
                    if (int.TryParse(items[1], out count)){
                        if (dictAcculumator.ContainsKey(item)){
                            dictAcculumator[items[0]] += count;
                        }
                        else{
                            dictAcculumator.Add(items[0], count);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            if (file != null)
                file.Close();
        }
    } 
}

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (string key in dictAcculumator.Keys)
{
    //alternatively write to text file
    sb.AppendFormat("{0}|{1}\r\n", key, dictAcculumator[key].ToString());
}

Console.Write(sb.ToString());
share|improve this answer
    
Actually any real-life code which works with external input must check it for correctness, so your way is the only right way. (Your solution is however missing the reaction on errors, which I would leave as an exercise for the OP.) –  Vlad Nov 18 '10 at 19:10
1  
BTW, perhaps you don't need try/finally, because autodisposing of the file at the end of using block will close it anyway. –  Vlad Nov 18 '10 at 19:15
    
@vlad. Good observation on the redundancy of the try / finally. –  Laramie Nov 18 '10 at 23:43
// read the text file
string[] wholeFile;
var values = new Dictionary<string, int>()
foreach (var line in lines)
{
    var pieces = line.Split('|');
    var name = pieces[0];
    var value = int.Parse(pieces[1]);
    if (!values.ContainsKey(name)
    {
        values[name] = 0;
    }

    values[name] = values[name] + value;
}
// spit it back out to a file.

I didn't do the file IO nor did I do error checking, but this should get you started.

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Create a Dictionary<string, int>. Loop through the lines of your text file, split the line at the "|". If there is no dictionary entry for the string, create one. Add the number to the value of the dictionary entry. When you are done looping through the text file, loop through your dictionary and output the results in the desired format.

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I'm sure there's a nice way to do this in LINQ but something like this would work.

string[] lines = File.ReadAllLines("myfile");

Dictionary<string, int> totals = new Dictionary<string, int>();
foreach (string line in lines)
{
  string[] fields = line.Split(new char[]{'|'});
  if (!totals.ContainsKey(fields[0]))
  {
    totals[fields[0]] = 0;
  }
  totals[fields[0]] += Convert.ToInt32(fields[1]);
}

foreach (KeyValuePair<string, int> total in totals)
{
  Console.WriteLine("{0}|{1}", total.Key, total.Value);
}
share|improve this answer

You can do it by creating a dictionary and iterating over the lines adding to the value if the element exists. I don't have visual studio with me right now, so bare with any potential syntax errors in the following:

var linesInFile = File.ReadAllLines("c:\path\to\yourfile.txt");

var dict = new Dictionary<string, int>();

foreach(var line in linesInFile)
{
    var parts = string.Split(new char[] {'|'});
    var item = parts[0];
    var amount = int.Parse(parts[1]);
    if(dict.HasKey(item)){
        dict[item] += amount;
    }else{
        dict.Add(item, amount);
    }
}

foreach(var kvp in dict)
{
     Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0}: {1}", kvp.Key, kvp.Value));
}
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The following is tested and works:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Data> items = new List<Data>();
        using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader("C:\\chedberg\\combine.txt"))
        {
            string line;
            string[] split;
            string name;
            int count;
            while (!reader.EndOfStream)
            {
                line = reader.ReadLine();
                if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(line))
                {
                    split = line.Split('|');
                    name = split[0];
                    if(Int32.TryParse(split[1],out count))
                        items.Add(new Data() { Name = name, Count = count });
                }
            }

            List<Data> combinedItems = new List<Data>();
            items.ForEach(item =>
                              {
                                  if (!combinedItems.Exists(combinedItem => combinedItem.Name == item.Name)) 
                                      combinedItems.Add(new Data(){Name = item.Name, Count = item.Count});
                                  else
                                  {
                                      combinedItems.Find(combinedItem => combinedItem.Name == item.Name).Count += item.Count;
                                  }
                              });
            using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter("C:\\chedberg\\combine_out.txt"))
            {
                combinedItems.ForEach(item => writer.WriteLine(String.Format("{0}|{1}",item.Name,item.Count)));
                writer.Flush();
            }
        }
    }

    public class Data
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int Count { get; set; }
    }
}

}

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