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First off, I did post this to the android google group first but its moderated and I'm not sure how long itll take to show up there so hoping someone here can help.

I created a simple app with a ListView following the ListActivity examples I found on the net.

The app has 2 activities with the first having a button to create the second. When i hit the close button on the second activity I would like it to release its memory (or at least allow it to be garbage collected). Currently it will never release.

I must be doing something wrong here because the MyListActivity never gets released. Can anyone tell me if I am doing something wrong with the way my activities are created/destroyed? or if my usage of the ListView is wrong?

Thanks.

My App as a zip - http://www.mediafire.com/?l26o5hz2bmbwk6j

Screen Shot of Eclipse MAT showing the list activity never releasing memory - www.mediafire.com/?qr6ga0k

public class MyListActivity extends ListActivity {  
/** Called when the activity is first created. */
@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.listlayout);        
    ListAdapter ada = new ArrayAdapter<String>(this,android.R.layout.simple_list_item_1, GENRES);               
    setListAdapter(ada);    
}

@Override
public void onDestroy()
{                   
    super.onDestroy();
    System.gc();
}

public void ClickHandler(View target)
{
    switch (target.getId())
    {
        case R.id.LL_Btn1:
            finish();
            break;
    }
}   

private static final String[] GENRES = new String[] {
    "Action", "Adventure", "Animation", "Children", "Comedy", "Documentary", "Drama",
    "Foreign", "History", "Independent", "Romance", "Sci-Fi", "Television", "Thriller"
};} 

public class MainActivity extends Activity {
/** Called when the activity is first created. */
@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);
}

public void ClickHandler(View target)
{
    switch (target.getId())
    {
        case R.id.M_Button01:
            Intent intent = new Intent();
            intent.setClassName(MyListActivity.class.getPackage().getName(), MyListActivity.class.getName());         
            startActivity(intent);  
            break;
    }
}}
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1  
Eh...I'm not downloading a zip, thanks. Can you post relevant snippets? –  Jonathon Faust Nov 18 '10 at 18:49
1  
What makes you think there's a leak? Android could keep your activity running for a long time unless it needs the memory. –  dhaag23 Nov 18 '10 at 19:12
    
The reason im sure it is a memory leak is that I can keep doing this until my application crashes, by opening the activity and closing it. It will not release the memory. Eclipse's MAT tool is showing a dependancy on mContext. –  Tyler Zale Nov 18 '10 at 23:13
    
Have you tried to GC several times in DDMS before you generating the report? –  shiami Nov 19 '10 at 3:04
    
Many many times. I am positive that this is leaking but I'm too new to android to tell why. –  Tyler Zale Nov 19 '10 at 5:13
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2 Answers

Have you tried getting rid of System.gc() and see what happens? Calling System.gc() is merely telling the VM to initiate garbage collection - there is no guarantee when it will be done.

share|improve this answer
    
System.gc does not cause memory leaks. yes it may not always release things instantly but it doesnt hurt to hint to the vm when to clean stuff. –  Tyler Zale Nov 19 '10 at 5:14
    
I'm not saying System.gc causes memory leaks, just that its not good practice to rely on calling it to "magically" appear to resolve your memory leaks :) –  Thira Nov 28 '10 at 23:46
    
system.gc() isn't there to try and fix the leak its there because its a good place to call it. :) –  Tyler Zale Nov 29 '10 at 17:10
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Not sure if this will help, and its not generally recommended to do this, but the following will kill your process in onDestroy():

System.runFinalizersOnExit(true); android.os.Process.killProcess(android.os.Process.myPid());

Put that in the onDestroy method. Now this may actually kill your main process if called from a child activity (havn't tested it).

WARNING: I generally don't recommend doing this as its a "hackly" way of doing it, but if you just need your app (or activity) to close upon exit then this will work. You still need to debug to find out why your app is staying open and eating memory.

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