Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a subclass with an over-ridden method that I know always returns a particular subtype of the return type declared in the base class. If I write the code this way, it won't compile. Since that probably doesn't make sense, let me give a code example:

class BaseReturnType { }
class DerivedReturnType : BaseReturnType { }

abstract class BaseClass {
    public abstract BaseReturnType PolymorphicMethod();
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass {
    // Compile Error: return type must be 'BaseReturnType' to match 
    // overridden member 'BaseClass.PolymorphicMethod()'
    public override DerivedReturnType PolymorphicMethod() { 
        return new DerivedReturnType(); 
    }
}

Is there any way to accomplish this in C#? If not, what's the best way to achieve something similar? And why isn't it allowed? It doesn't seem to allow any logical inconsistency, since any object returned from the over-ridden method still is BaseReturnType. Maybe there is something I hadn't considered though. Or maybe the reason is technological or historical.

share|improve this question
    
What does the complier say? –  Rowland Shaw Jan 7 '09 at 20:05
    
I've included the compiler error as the comment. –  recursive Jan 7 '09 at 20:09

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Unfortunately no, covariant return types aren't supported in C# for method overriding. (Ditto contravariant parameter types.)

If you're implementing an interface you can implement it explicitly with the "weak" version and also provide a public version with the stronger contract. For simple overriding of a parent class, you don't have this luxury I'm afraid :(

(EDIT: Marc has a reasonable solution - although it's pretty ugly, and method hiding is generally a bad thing for readability. No offence meant, Marc ;)

I believe this is actually a CLR restriction, not just a language one - but I could well be wrong.

(As a matter of history, Java (the language) had the same restriction until 1.5 - but it gained covariance at the same time as generics.)

share|improve this answer
1  
None taken ;-p Note, however, that this is exactly the pattern used by a lot of the .NET BCL - for example DbConnection has CreateCommand, which shims thru the "protected abstract" CreateDbCommand. –  Marc Gravell Jan 7 '09 at 20:23
1  
See this comment by Eric Lippert about why C# doesn't support it stackoverflow.com/questions/1319663/… –  Ben Lings Feb 21 '10 at 14:59

You could make the class generic if that doesn't bothers you:

    class BaseReturnType { }
    class DerivedReturnType : BaseReturnType { }

    abstract class BaseClass<T> where T : BaseReturnType
    {
        public abstract T PolymorphicMethod();
    }

    class DerivedClass : BaseClass<DerivedReturnType>
    {
        // Error: return type must be 'BaseReturnType' to match 
        // overridden member 'BaseClass.PolymorphicMethod()'
        public override DerivedReturnType PolymorphicMethod()
        {
            return new DerivedReturnType();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

You can do this if you introduce an extra method to override (since you can't override and new a method with the same name in the same type):

abstract class BaseClass
{
    public BaseReturnType PolymorphicMethod()
    { return PolymorphicMethodCore();}

    protected abstract BaseReturnType PolymorphicMethodCore();
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    protected override BaseReturnType PolymorphicMethodCore()
    { return PolymorphicMethod(); }

    public new DerivedReturnType PolymorphicMethod()
    { return new DerivedReturnType(); }
}

Now you have a PolymorphicMethod method at each level with the correct type.

share|improve this answer
class BaseReturnType { }
class DerivedReturnType : BaseReturnType { }

abstract class BaseClass {
    public abstract BaseReturnType PolymorphicMethod();
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass {
    // Error: return type must be 'BaseReturnType' to match 
    // overridden member 'BaseClass.PolymorphicMethod()'
    public override BaseReturnType PolymorphicMethod() { 
        return new DerivedReturnType(); 
    }
}

this should work

share|improve this answer
    
I think the OP wants the method to be declared as DerivedReturnType, not just to return one. –  Marc Gravell Jan 7 '09 at 20:11
    
I know this is possible, but then it requires you to cast (new DerivedClass()).PolymorphicMethod() if you want to use it as a DerivedReturnType. That may be what I end up doing, but I don't like casting if I can avoid it. –  recursive Jan 7 '09 at 20:12
    
he can cast the returnval wherever its needed as Derived –  anand Jan 7 '09 at 20:13
    
damn I type too slow :P –  anand Jan 7 '09 at 20:14
    
@anand: Yes, but that's painful, as well as making a check necessary at execution time when we should be able to explain that it's valid at compile time. –  Jon Skeet Jan 7 '09 at 20:14

Change your method signature on Derived class to:

 public override BaseReturnType PolymorphicMethod() 
 {
    return new DerivedReturnType();     
 }

C# doesn't support variant return types. You can check out this post for a way to do this using Generics...http://srtsolutions.com/blogs/billwagner/archive/2005/06/17/covaraint-return-types-in-c.aspx

Here's a sample using Generics in your model:

public class BaseReturnType
{
}
public class DerivedReturnType : BaseReturnType
{
}

public abstract class BaseClass<T> where T : BaseReturnType
{
    public abstract T PolymorphicMethod();

}

public class DerviedClass : BaseClass<DerivedReturnType>
{
    public override DerivedReturnType PolymorphicMethod()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Generics are not necessarily the way to go. In particular, type(of Derived) is not considered a type(of Base).

First, add a new method to your derived class which will return the value with the correct type. Second, mark the overriding method not-overridable and have it delegate to your new method.

That's it. You've solved your problem. Child classes won't be able to re-expand the type because they must override your new method.

I apologize if the code isn't quite right; I'm used to VB.net.

abstract class C1 {
    public abstract IEnumerable<Byte> F1();
}
class C2 : C1 {
    public sealed override IEnumerable<Byte> F1() {
        Return F2();
    }
    public overridable IList<Byte> F2() {
        Return {1, 2, 3, 4};
    }
}
share|improve this answer

It seems to me that you need to be returning an interface, not a base class.

share|improve this answer
1  
Firstly that's not always applicable, and secondly it may not help anyway - you might want to indicate that you're returning an implementation of ISpecificInterface where the base class declares that it will return IGeneralInterface. –  Jon Skeet Jan 7 '09 at 20:10

Heh, I was all about to post my answer, but Stormenet and Josh beat me to it.

The answer is, use Generics.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.