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I have a Maven profile for a Java project that is activated when doing a final build on a Hudson CI server.

Currently this profile's only customization is to the Maven compiler plugin as follows:

                <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                    <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                    <configuration>
                        <debug>false</debug>
                        <optimize>true</optimize>
                    </configuration>
                </plugin>

Are there any other tweaks or optimizations to the Java compiler that a final build should be doing to maximize performance?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Assuming that you're running on the Sun (Hotspot) JVM, all optimization happens in the JVM.

So specifying <optimize>true</optimize> does nothing.

And specifying <debug>false</debug> simply removes debugging symbols. Which will slightly decrease your JARfile size, but make it much harder to track down production problems, because you won't have line numbers in your stack traces.


One thing that I would specify is JVM compatibility settings:

<source>1.6</source>
<target>1.6</target>
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Are you saying that leaving the debug symbols in there doesn't hurt performance? Will do on the v1.6 settings. –  HDave Nov 18 '10 at 20:59
3  
@HDave - debugging information is stored in the LineNumberTable and LocalVariableTable in the .class file (see java.sun.com/docs/books/jvms/second_edition/html/…). While this may consume additional memory, it is separate from the bytecode, and therefore does not directly affect execution performance. –  Anon Nov 18 '10 at 21:15
    
Good to know...thanks. –  HDave Nov 18 '10 at 22:01

You shouldn't even do that - optimization in javac has been disabled for quite a while, IIRC. Basically the JIT is responsible for almost all the optimization, and the javac optimizations actually hurt that in some cases.

If you're looking to tune performance you should look elsewhere:

  • Your actual code
  • VM options (e.g. GC tuning)
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I would not recommend optimizing unless performance is an issue, especially since the JIT really is very good. –  extraneon Nov 18 '10 at 19:36
    
@extraneon: You've missed my point - optimization actively hurt performance, so basically it was removed. –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '10 at 19:45
    
I actually meant code optimizing and GC optimizing. Code optimization may result in less readable code, and GC options may be surprising to the uninformed. –  extraneon Nov 18 '10 at 20:00
    
@extraneon: Right, yes. I think it's worth doing architectural optimization early, but not low-level micro-optimization. –  Jon Skeet Nov 18 '10 at 20:22

For our maven based build I do not use <debug>false</debug> instead I'm setting the debug options with <debuglevel/> which allows a much more finer control {see javac option -g }.

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I tried this out and have a follow-up question on this: stackoverflow.com/questions/4220083/… –  HDave Nov 18 '10 at 22:08

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