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I have two byte arrays with the same length. I need to perform XOR operation between each byte and after this calculate sum of bits.

For example:

11110000^01010101 = 10100101 -> so 1+1+1+1 = 4

I need do the same operation for each element in byte array.

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8 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Use a lookup table. There are only 256 possible values after XORing, so it's not exactly going to take a long time. Unlike izb's solution though, I wouldn't suggest manually putting all the values in though - compute the lookup table once at startup using one of the looping answers.

For example:

public static class ByteArrayHelpers
{
    private static readonly int[] LookupTable =
        Enumerable.Range(0, 256).Select(CountBits).ToArray();

    private static int CountBits(int value)
    {
        int count = 0;
        for (int i=0; i < 8; i++)
        {
           count += (value >> i) & 1;
        }
        return count;
    }

    public static int CountBitsAfterXor(byte[] array)
    {
        int xor = 0;
        foreach (byte b in array)
        {
            xor ^= b;
        }
        return LookupTable[xor];
    }
}

(You could make it an extension method if you really wanted...)

Note the use of byte[] in the CountBitsAfterXor method - you could make it an IEnumerable<byte> for more generality, but iterating over an array (which is known to be an array at compile-time) will be faster. Probably only microscopically faster, but hey, you asked for the fastest way :)

I would almost certainly actually express it as

public static int CountBitsAfterXor(IEnumerable<byte> data)

in real life, but see which works better for you.

Also note the type of the xor variable as an int. In fact, there's no XOR operator defined for byte values, and if you made xor a byte it would still compile due to the nature of compound assignment operators, but it would be performing a cast on each iteration - at least in the IL. It's quite possible that the JIT would take care of this, but there's no need to even ask it to :)

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Thanks, waiting for code example or link.. –  Andrew Orsich Nov 18 '10 at 19:53
    
Thanks a lot for your answer. –  Andrew Orsich Nov 18 '10 at 20:04
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It can be rewritten as ulong and use unsafe pointer, but byte is easier to understand:

static int BitCount(byte num)
{
    // 0x5 = 0101 (bit) 0x55 = 01010101
    // 0x3 = 0011 (bit) 0x33 = 00110011
    // 0xF = 1111 (bit) 0x0F = 00001111
    uint count = num;
    count = ((count >> 1) & 0x55) + (count & 0x55);
    count = ((count >> 2) & 0x33) + (count & 0x33);
    count = ((count >> 4) & 0xF0) + (count & 0x0F);
    return (int)count;
}
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Has a typo in the third calculation, 0xF0 mask is wrong when done after the shift, should use 0x0F mask. –  Zarat Sep 26 '12 at 19:31
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A general function to count bits could look like:

int Count1(byte[] a)
{
  int count = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
  {
    byte b = a[i];
    while (b != 0)
    {
      count++;
      b = (byte)((int)b & (int)(b - 1));
    }
  }
  return count;
}

The less 1-bits, the faster this works. It simply loops over each byte, and toggles the lowest 1 bit of that byte until the byte becomes 0. The castings are necessary so that the compiler stops complaining about the type widening and narrowing.

Your problem could then be solved by using this:

int Count1Xor(byte[] a1, byte[] a2)
{
  int count = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < Math.Min(a1.Length, a2.Length); i++)
  {
    byte b = (byte)((int)a1[i] ^ (int)a2[i]);
    while (b != 0)
    {
      count++;
      b = (byte)((int)b & (int)(b - 1));
    }
  }
  return count;
}
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This is more commonly referred to as bit counting. There are literally dozens of different algorithms for doing this. Here is one site which lists a few of the more well known methods. There are even CPU specific instructions for doing this.

Theorectically, Microsoft could add a BitArray.CountSetBits function that gets JITed with the best algorithm for that CPU architecture. I, for one, would welcome such an addition.

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1  
Thanks for good link. –  Andrew Orsich Nov 18 '10 at 20:08
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Fastest way would probably be a 256-element lookup table...

int[] lut
{
    /*0x00*/ 0,
    /*0x01*/ 1,
    /*0x02*/ 1,
    /*0x03*/ 2
    ...
    /*0xFE*/ 7,
    /*0xFF*/ 8
}

e.g.

11110000^01010101 = 10100101 -> lut[165] == 4
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+1 Nabbits. I was just gonna post this -- Your implicit parallel skills are outstanding :-) –  user166390 Nov 18 '10 at 19:46
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The following should do

int BitXorAndSum(byte[] left, byte[] right) {
  int sum = 0;
  for ( var i = 0; i < left.Length; i++) { 
    sum += SumBits((byte)(left[i] ^ right[i]));
  }
  return sum;
}

int SumBits(byte b) {
  var sum = 0;
  for (var i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
    sum += (0x1) & (b >> i);
  }
  return sum;
}
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That sums the bytes. I understood the OP to mean he wanted the bits to be summed? –  winwaed Nov 18 '10 at 19:43
    
Hi. Thanks for answer. But i need sum of bits, not simple sum. See my example above. –  Andrew Orsich Nov 18 '10 at 19:43
    
yeah sum of bits. –  Andrew Orsich Nov 18 '10 at 19:44
    
@winaed, @Bugai13 my bad. Updated. –  JaredPar Nov 18 '10 at 19:47
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I'm not sure if you mean sum the bytes or the bits. To sum the bits within a byte, this should work:

int nSum = 0;
for (int i=0; i<=7; i++)
{
   nSum += (byte_val>>i) & 1;
}

You would then need the xoring, and array looping around this, of course.

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As I understood it you want to sum the bits of each XOR between the left and right bytes.

for (int b = 0; b < left.Length; b++) {
  int num = left[b] ^ right[b];
  int sum = 0;

  for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
    sum += (num >> i) & 1;
  }

   // do something with sum maybe?
}
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1  
if performance is a consideration you may want to precalculate the sum of the the bits for each of the 256 possible byte combiniation and store them in a lookup table. I THINK that would give a performance gain but you'd need to benchmark it. –  eoldre Nov 18 '10 at 19:47
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