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I am kind of new at Xpath and I was wondering if you guys could help me. I have 2 XPath questions.

Question 1

I have an xml file like this:

<test>
   <test1></test1>
   <test2></test2>
   <test3>
      <bla1></bla1>
      <bla2></bla2>
   </test3>
   <test3></test3>
</test>

Now what I want to accomplish is the following, I want to get all the nodes except for the test3 nodes. I have tried /*[not(name()='test3')] and some other things I found online, but none of them seem to work.. maybe you guys can help me?

Question 2

Is it possible with XPath to add a node to an xml? How can I do this?

say I have an xml like this:

<rootnode>
  <node1></node1>
</rootnode>

and I want to add another node, how can I do this with XPath, or is this impossible?

Thanks for your help.

From comments:

I want to get all the nodes except for the test3 nodes (and its innernodes). so if there is a <bla> in test2, I want to get it.

Question 3

I have 1 more question :p Say that I want to filter the test3 nodes by index. So I want to remove all test3 nodes except for the first one (or the second or third, defined by the index I give). How would one do this?

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Good question, +1. See my answer: it provides the exact XPath expression that selects the nodes you asked for. The currently selected answer is not correct, because it selects only element nodes. –  Dimitre Novatchev Nov 19 '10 at 5:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1: You were only searching the root, but not the descendant nodes. Also, the name() check should be avoided because it is unreliable when prefixes and namespaces are being used. Try this:

//*[not(ancestor-or-self::test3)]

2: XPath is querying XML only. However, there ar related technologies such as XSLT and XQuery which allow the transformation of XML. Or you can use a DOM in a programming language where you use XPath to identify the nodes and then operations on the DOM to modify them.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with //*[not(self::test3)] is that it also returns the <bla></bla> nodes located in test3. I want to get rid of those 2.. Thx for the quick reply :) –  Rise_against Nov 18 '10 at 21:12
    
You did write "all nodes except test3"... ;-) Do you want to get the inner nodes (e.g. if there was a bla node in test2, do you want it or not)? –  Lucero Nov 18 '10 at 21:14
    
Yes, I want to get all the nodes except for the test3 nodes (and its innernodes). so if there is a <bla> in test2, I want to get it. –  Rise_against Nov 18 '10 at 21:18
    
Okay, that's easy - done! ;-) –  Lucero Nov 18 '10 at 21:27
    
+1 Good answer. –  user357812 Nov 18 '10 at 21:29

Now what I want to accomplish is the following, I want to get all the nodes except for the test3 nodes.

Use:

    //node()[not(ancestor-or-self::test3) 
           and 
            not(self::processing-instruction('test3'))] 
   | 
    //*[not(ancestor-or-self::test3)]/@*[not(name()='test3')] 
   | 
    //*[not(ancestor-or-self::test3)]/namespace::*[not(name()='test3')]

Do note that in XPath every element is a node, but not every node is an element. The expression above selects every node in the document, whose name isn't test3 and that has no parent or ancestor named test3.

There are the following types of nodes in the XPath data model:

  1. document-node() (also called "root node) -- selected by / .

  2. element() node, selected by a name test in the child axis, such as child::test3 just test3 or child::* or just * .

  3. text() node, selected by text() .

  4. comment() node, selected by comment()

  5. processing-instruction() node, selected by processing-instruction() or by processing-instruction('someName') .

  6. attribute() node, selected by a name test on the attribute axis, such as attribute::x or @x or @*.

  7. Namespace node, selected by a name test or a wild card on the namespace axis, such as namespace::x or namespace::*.

Do note: The node- test node() selects any of the above 7 types of nodes (which are allowed on the currently specified or default axis. Without axis specified, node() selects any node of type 1 - 5 above.

share|improve this answer
    
I think OP has meant element instead of node. Besides that, this is a good answer, also +1 –  user357812 Nov 19 '10 at 23:30

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