Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an xml file whose lines should look like this:

<item id=""><myname>FIRST NAME</myname><myurl>http://etc.com</myurl></item>

I can easily replace the " myurl=" below to make the line look like the one above.

<item id=""><myname>FIRST NAME" myURL="http://etc.com</myurl></item>

Unfortunately, most of them look like this, with different amounts of white space in b/t:

<item id=""><myname>FIRST NAME"                   
         myURL="http://etc.com</myurl></item>

I can't seem to get a working SED replace for whitespace in b/t characters

share|improve this question
    
Your XML is malformed in <myURL> - is this intentional? –  Gary Rowe Nov 18 '10 at 21:23
    
No, sorry! Fixed. –  Frank LoVecchio Nov 18 '10 at 21:26
    
Does the last one have a newline or is it wrapped due to a large number of spaces? –  Dennis Williamson Nov 19 '10 at 2:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
sed '/myname>.*\"\s*$/N;s|\"\s*\n*\s*myURL=\"|</myname><myurl>|' file.xml

This first tests if the line is incomplete. If it is, it places the next line into the pattern space. In either case, it replaces the original text with the desired text.

BTW, if anyone can tell me a way to match a newline in the pattern space in a character set I would appreciate it. For example, [\s\n]* instead of \s*\n*\s* in the above expression.

input:

<item id=""><myname>FIRST NAME" myURL="http://etc.com</myurl></item>
<item id=""><myname>FIRST NAME"                   
         myURL="http://etc.com</myurl></item>
<item id=""><myname>FIRST NAME" myURL="http://etc.com</myurl></item>

output:

<item id=""><myname>FIRST NAME</myname><myurl>http://etc.com</myurl></item>
<item id=""><myname>FIRST NAME</myname><myurl>http://etc.com</myurl></item>
<item id=""><myname>FIRST NAME</myname><myurl>http://etc.com</myurl></item>
share|improve this answer

Is regex 's/ */ /g' what you're looking for? (for all strings of two or more spaces, substitute a single space).

share|improve this answer
    
That's three spaces between the first slash and the asterisk (it's not easy to see). –  Dennis Williamson Nov 19 '10 at 3:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.