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I'm writing tests for a function like next one:

def foo():
    print 'hello world!'

so when i want to test this function the code will be like this:

import sys
from foomodule import foo
def test_foo():
    foo()
    output = sys.stdout.getline().strip() # because stdout is an StringIO instance
    assert output == 'hello world!'

but if i run nosetests with -s parameter the test crashes. How can i catch the output with unittest or nose module?

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5 Answers 5

If you really want to do this, you can reassign sys.stdout for the duration of the test.

def test_foo():
    import sys
    from foomodule import foo
    from StringIO import StringIO

    saved_stdout = sys.stdout
    try:
        out = StringIO()
        sys.stdout = out
        foo()
        output = out.getvalue().strip()
        assert output == 'hello world!'
    finally:
        sys.stdout = saved_stdout

If I were writing this code, however, I would prefer to pass an optional out parameter to the foo function.

def foo(out=sys.stdout):
    out.write("hello, world!")

Then the test is much simpler:

def test_foo():
    from foomodule import foo
    from StringIO import StringIO

    out = StringIO()
    foo(out=out)
    output = out.getvalue().strip()
    assert output == 'hello world!'
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1  
Note: Under python 3.x the StringIO class must now be imported from the io module. from io import StringIO works in python 2.6+. –  Bryan P May 8 '13 at 22:26
    
If you use from io import StringIO in python 2, you get a TypeError: unicode argument expected, got 'str' when printing. –  matiasg May 14 at 14:23

I use this context manager to capture output. It ultimately uses the same technique as some of the other answers by temporarily replacing sys.stdout. I prefer the context manager because it wraps all the bookkeeping into a single function, so I don't have to re-write any try-finally code, and I don't have to write setup and teardown functions just for this.

from contextlib import contextmanager
from StringIO import StringIO

@contextmanager
def captured_output():
    new_out, new_err = StringIO(), StringIO()
    old_out, old_err = sys.stdout, sys.stderr
    try:
        sys.stdout, sys.stderr = new_out, new_err
        yield sys.stdout, sys.stderr
    finally:
        sys.stdout, sys.stderr = old_out, old_err

Use it like this:

with captured_output() as (out, err):
    foo()
# This can go inside or outside the `with` block
output = out.getvalue().strip()
self.assertEqual(output, 'hello world!')

Furthermore, since the original output state is restored upon exiting the with block, we can set up a second capture block in the same function as the first one, which isn't possible using setup and teardown functions, and gets wordy when writing try-finally blocks manually. That ability came in handy when the goal of a test was to compare the results of two functions relative to each other rather than to some precomputed value.

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Since version 2.7, you do not need anymore to reassign sys.stdout, this is provided through buffer flag. Moreover, it is the default behavior of nosetest.

Here is a sample failing in non buffered context:

import sys
import unittest

def foo():
    print 'hello world!'

class Case(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_foo(self):
        foo()
        if not hasattr(sys.stdout, "getvalue"):
            self.fail("need to run in buffered mode")
        output = sys.stdout.getvalue().strip() # because stdout is an StringIO instance
        self.assertEquals(output,'hello world!')

You can set buffer through unit2 command line flag -b, --buffer or in unittest.main options. The opposite is achieved through nosetest flag --nocapture.

if __name__=="__main__":   
    assert not hasattr(sys.stdout, "getvalue")
    unittest.main(module=__name__, buffer=True, exit=False)
    #.
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #Ran 1 test in 0.000s
    #
    #OK
    assert not hasattr(sys.stdout, "getvalue")

    unittest.main(module=__name__, buffer=False)
    #hello world!
    #F
    #======================================================================
    #FAIL: test_foo (__main__.Case)
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #Traceback (most recent call last):
    #  File "test_stdout.py", line 15, in test_foo
    #    self.fail("need to run in buffered mode")
    #AssertionError: need to run in buffered mode
    #
    #----------------------------------------------------------------------
    #Ran 1 test in 0.002s
    #
    #FAILED (failures=1)
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I'm only just learning Python and found myself struggling with a similar problem to the one above with unit tests for methods with output. My passing unit test for foo module above has ended up looking like this:

import sys
import unittest
from foo import foo
from StringIO import StringIO

class FooTest (unittest.TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        self.held, sys.stdout = sys.stdout, StringIO()

    def test_foo(self):
        foo()
        self.assertEqual(sys.stdout.getvalue(),'hello world!\n')
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You might want to do a sys.stdout.getvalue().strip() and not cheat comparing with \n :) –  Silviu Feb 10 at 19:44

Writing tests often shows us a better way to write our code. Similar to Shane's answer, I'd like to suggest yet another way of looking at this. Do you really want to assert that your program outputted a certain string, or just that it constructed a certain string for output? This becomes easier to test, since we can probably assume that the Python print statement does its job correctly.

def foo_msg():
    return 'hello world'

def foo():
    print foo_msg()

Then your test is very simple:

def test_foo_msg():
    assert 'hello world' == foo_msg()

Of course, if you really have a need to test your program's actual output, then feel free to disregard. :)

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but in this case foo will not be tested... maybe that's a problem –  Pedro Valencia Nov 21 '10 at 4:54
3  
From a testing purist's perspective, perhaps it's a problem. From a practical standpoint, if foo() doesn't do anything but call the print statement, it's probably not a problem. –  Alison R. Nov 21 '10 at 17:44

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