Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have installed LZO on my Ubuntu machine and I would like to use ti to compress a char* type string.

In the example files I have found this code snippet (I have already edited it just a little for my application):

  int r;
  lzo_bytep in;
  lzo_bytep out;
  lzo_voidp wrkmem;
  lzo_uint in_len;
  lzo_uint out_len;
  lzo_uint new_len;
  int strToCompressLen; // I have added this

  /*
   * Step 1: initialize the LZO library
   */
  if (lzo_init() != LZO_E_OK)
  {
    cout << "internal error - lzo_init() failed !!!" << endl;
    cout << "(this usually indicates a compiler bug - try recompiling\nwithout optimizations, and enable '-DLZO_DEBUG' for diagnostics)" << endl;
    //return 4;
  }

  // here I get the data I want to compress
  char* imageData = (char*)imageIn->getFrame();

  /*
   * Step 2: allocate blocks and the work-memory
   */
  strToCompressLen = strlen(imageData);
  in = (lzo_bytep) xmalloc(strToCompressLen);
  out = (lzo_bytep) xmalloc((strToCompressLen + strToCompressLen / 16 + 64 + 3));
  wrkmem = (lzo_voidp) xmalloc(LZO1X_1_MEM_COMPRESS);
  if (in == NULL || out == NULL || wrkmem == NULL)
  {
        cout << "out of memory" << endl;
        //return 3;
  }

  /*
   * Step 3: prepare the input block that will get compressed.
   *         We just fill it with zeros in this example program,
   *         but you would use your real-world data here.
   */
  in_len = strToCompressLen;
  lzo_memset(in,0,in_len);

  /*
   * Step 4: compress from 'in' to 'out' with LZO1X-1
   */
  r = lzo1x_1_compress(in,in_len,out,&out_len,wrkmem);
  if (r != LZO_E_OK)
  {
        /* this should NEVER happen */
        cout << "internal error - compression failed: " << r << endl;
        //return 2;
  }
  /* check for an incompressible block */
  if (out_len >= in_len)
  {
        cout << "This block contains incompressible data." << endl;
    //return 0;
  }

But what it does is it just fill in zeros. I need to compress a char* variable.

I guess I need to edit these lines:

  in_len = strToCompressLen;
  lzo_memset(in,0,in_len);

I have the string I want to compress in this variable:

  char* imageData = (char*)imageIn->getFrame();

Do I need to cast it to some other type?

The documentation to LZO is not very helpful (or maybe I just can't use it properly).

share|improve this question
    
<< is the left shift operator in C. You're using it and discarding the result ... so, at best, the statements have no effect. –  pmg Nov 18 '10 at 22:05
    
This is C++ code. –  Richard Knop Nov 18 '10 at 22:16
    
c tag removed –  pmg Nov 18 '10 at 22:29
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are three main points of confusion:

  1. It's best not to use char* when the buffer the pointer is pointing to is not a null-terminated string as it's confusing.
  2. strlen() will only give you the length of a null-terminated string, it won't give you the size of an arbitrary buffer in memory. You need to get that information elsewhere.
  3. The buffer you pass to lzo1x_1_compress() actually needs to contain the data you want to compress and not an empty buffer full of zeros.

Assuming you can get the size of your image from imageIn using something like imageIn->getFrameSizeBytes(), try this:

  int r;
  lzo_bytep out;
  lzo_voidp wrkmem;
  lzo_uint out_len;
  lzo_uint new_len;

  /*
   * Step 1: initialize the LZO library
   */
  if (lzo_init() != LZO_E_OK)
  {
    cout << "internal error - lzo_init() failed !!!" << endl;
    cout << "(this usually indicates a compiler bug - try recompiling\nwithout optimizations, and enable '-DLZO_DEBUG' for diagnostics)" << endl;
    //return 4;
  }

  // here I get the data I want to compress
  lzo_bytep imageData = (lzo_bytep) imageIn->getFrame();
  size_t uncompressedImageSize = imageIn->getFrameSizeBytes();

  /*
   * Step 2: allocate blocks and the work-memory
   */
  out = (lzo_bytep) xmalloc((uncompressedImageSize + uncompressedImageSize / 16 + 64 + 3));
  wrkmem = (lzo_voidp) xmalloc(LZO1X_1_MEM_COMPRESS);
  if (out == NULL || wrkmem == NULL)
  {
        cout << "out of memory" << endl;
        //return 3;
  }

  /*
   * Step 4: compress from 'imageData' to 'out' with LZO1X-1
   */
  r = lzo1x_1_compress(imageData,uncompressedImageSize,out,&out_len,wrkmem);
  if (r != LZO_E_OK)
  {
        /* this should NEVER happen */
        cout << "internal error - compression failed: " << r << endl;
        //return 2;
  }

  /* check for an incompressible block */
  if (out_len >= uncompressedImageSize)
  {
        cout << "This block contains incompressible data." << endl;
    //return 0;
  }

Don't forget to free wrkmem. Even better, use C++ and std::vector for the working memory so it is freed automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
I have an image height and width. Would cvSize(width, height) get me the correct byte size for LZO? –  Richard Knop Nov 18 '10 at 23:07
    
width*height might as long as you have one byte per pixel and no padding at the end of rows. Without knowing what getFrame() is it is difficult to know! –  Bids Nov 18 '10 at 23:29
    
It is a 640x480px image with YUV colorspace. Won't sizeof(imageData) work? Sorry if this is a dumb question, I am a C++ newbie. –  Richard Knop Nov 18 '10 at 23:43
    
sizeof(imageData) will only give you the size of the pointer (i.e. 4 or 8 depending on the memory model). There is no real support for finding out the size of a memory block in C++, the object returning the pointer also needs to provide a method for finding out the size of that pointer. –  Bids Nov 22 '10 at 10:33
add comment

What type does getFrame() return? Why do you need to cast it to char*? The most obvious problem is using strlen() on binary data -- strlen stops when it encounters the first zero-byte.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, later I edit the frames with OpenCV. But it's ok, it works great without a compression. The casting to char is not causing any problems. I just need to compress it because I will send the frame over wifi to another PC and I want to save bandwidth. –  Richard Knop Nov 18 '10 at 22:03
    
An answer to the compression question below, however personally I wouldn't bother with the extra complexity of compression unless profiling showed that the network was saturated and the transfer wasn't quick enough. Modern wifi has quite a lot of bandwidth! –  Bids Nov 18 '10 at 22:20
    
@Bird Actually the problem is wifi is not fast enough. Right now we are getting 15fps (15 frames per second). We need it to go faster so that's why I thought a compression could help us. –  Richard Knop Nov 18 '10 at 22:32
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.