Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I have a generic abstract class, let's say Animal, and have it implement a constant (or a variable; it doesn't mind) which must be redefined by all subclasses?

Example:

abstract class Animal {
    private static int venerableAge;
}

And force Dog to be defined something like

class Dog extends Animal {
    private static int venerableAge = 10;
}

I don't want different subclasses to be able to read nor write each others' value. Just the one of themselves.

I.e., each class must have its own static "instance" of the variable. And no one will access the parent's.

Is that possible in Java?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The trick is to do this with getter methods rather than directly with fields:

abstract class Animal {
   abstract int getVenerableAge();
}

class Dog extends Animal {
   private static int venerableAge = 10;

   public int getVenerableAge() {
      return venerableAge;
   }
}

EDIT: How about letting the constructor do the contract binding:

abstract class Animal {
    public Animal(int venerableAge){
       //carry out sense checks here. i.e.:
       if (venerableAge < 0) { /* doSomething */ }
    }
}

class Dog extends Animal {
   private static int venerableAge;

   public Dog(int age) {
      super(age)
      venerableAge = age;
   }
}

Now Dog and Cat are both forced to be created with venerable ages, but (as implemented above) can't see each others value.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the answer, but the method is now public, and I want the value not to be read by anyone but the own class. (Yet I want to force it to be set). I edited my question a bit to avoid confussion. –  ssice Nov 18 '10 at 21:53
    
You can make the method protected instead of public, so other classes won't be able to access it. –  MBCook Nov 18 '10 at 21:55
    
I mean, subclasses neither. –  ssice Nov 18 '10 at 21:56
    
@ssice Can you provide further details as to why you are trying to do this? I'm not sure what you are trying to do makes sense. –  Chris Knight Nov 18 '10 at 22:04
    
Neither do I. It's a theroetical question more than anything. Force a subclass to redefine something internal. –  ssice Nov 18 '10 at 22:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.