Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How do I return a disposable object in my function to ensure that it works properly within a using block? In my function, I want to act on the disposable object and also account for errors, which complicates this.

I have something similar to the following code so far:

DBHandle GetDB()
{
/*  // I can't do this, because the using block would dispose of my object within this function
    using( var db = DatabaseObj.GetHandle() )
    {
        db.Open();
        return db;
    }
*/
    var db = DatabaseObj.GetHandle();
    try
    {
        db.Open();
        return db;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        db.Dispose();
        throw ex;
    }
}

// In other code:
using( var obj = GetDB() ){ /* ... */ }

Edit: Posted a more general question similar to this so as to not confuse answers and discussion.

share|improve this question
1  
I think my answer to your more general question sums it up nicely, and the code you've got above looks correct to me. –  Gregory Higley Nov 19 '10 at 0:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've got the right approach, but seem a bit lost as to how it's right.

Consider the code that you (correctly) say can't work:

DBHandle GetDB()
{
    using( var db = DatabaseObj.GetHandle() )
    {
        db.Open();
        return db;
    }
}

This code is pretty much equivalent to:

DBHandle GetDB()
{
    var db = DatabaseObj.GetHandle();
    try
    {
      db.Open();
      return db;
    }
    finally
    {
        if(db != null)//not included if db is a value-type
          ((IDisposable)db).Dispose();
    }
}

A few things of note here include that the try doesn't happen until after the assignment (the same is true of using - it doesn't save you from exceptions prior to the assignment in the using) and that db is cast to IDisposable meaning both that it can't compile if that assignment isn't valid, and also that Dispose() can be either implicitly or explicitly implemented and this will work either way.

Now of course, finally blocks will execute whether an exception occurs or not. You can't use using because it's equivalent to a finally and you want to Dispose() in your method only if an exception occurs. Hence you take the finally and turn it into a catch:

DBHandle GetDB()
{
    var db = DatabaseObj.GetHandle();
    try
    {
      db.Open();
      return db;
    }
    catch
    {
        if(db != null)
          ((IDisposable)db).Dispose();
        throw;
    }
}

This is pretty much the same as you have, except for the addition of a null check (maybe you can rule out the need for it) and that I'm using the bare throw (it's generally a good idea when you are going to re-throw an exception without altering or examining it. In some cases throwing a new exception is better, in which case you should include the original as the InnerException property of that new exception, so as to provide further information to someone debugging).

So all in all, you were on the right track. Hopefully I've helped explain why.

share|improve this answer

'Using' is doing your try/catch work for you, just have the db.Open; using will guarantee that regardless of whether it throws, it will dispose your connection.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, but I don't want to dispose db in the GetDB function if it doesn't encounter any exception. So, I can't use using in GetDB. –  palswim Nov 18 '10 at 22:09
    
That's not how 'using' works. Instead, you want a factory that reuses its object as long as it's still valid. –  Paul Betts Nov 18 '10 at 22:12
    
Actually, a try..finally would be better than a try..catch as the exception isn't handled, and incidentally that is exactly what the using block does. So the using block already does the work, and better. :) –  Guffa Nov 18 '10 at 22:13
    
@palswim: You don't need a using in the GetDB method, or a try..catch either. Just get the connection, open it and return it. The using block that calls GetDB will always dispose the object. –  Guffa Nov 18 '10 at 22:15
    
@Guffa: I guess I don't know the internal workings of try..catch. You're saying that, even if my function doesn't make it to the return line, the higher-level using statement will still be able to properly dispose of the object? (In my mind, it would create e NullReferenceException or something.) –  palswim Nov 18 '10 at 22:22

If DBHandle implements IDisposable than what you have should work.

There is no 'special' way of returning IDisposable.

share|improve this answer

Hint: When returning a disposable object from your using-block, have in mind that the call to Dispose() is done when the return-statement is executed!!!

So an object returned from within a using-block will already be disposed when it comes out of the function.

See the following code for an example

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class MyDisposable : IDisposable
    {
        public void DoSomething()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("  In DoSomething");
        }

        #region IDisposable Members

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("  In Dispose");
        }

        #endregion
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Starting Main\n");

            Console.WriteLine("Before NormalMethod");
            NormalMethod();
            Console.WriteLine("After NormalMethod\n");

            Console.WriteLine("Before ReturningMethod");
            MyDisposable m = ReturningMethod();
            m.DoSomething(); // Here the object already has been disposed!
            Console.WriteLine("After ReturningMethod\n");

        }

        private static void NormalMethod()
        {
            using (MyDisposable myDisposable = new MyDisposable())
            {
                Console.WriteLine("  In NormalMethod");
            }
            return;
        }

        private static MyDisposable ReturningMethod()
        {
            using (MyDisposable myDisposable = new MyDisposable())
            {
                Console.WriteLine("  In ReturningMethod");
                return myDisposable;
            }
        }
    }
}

This will produce the following output:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

The return value simply has to implement IDisposable.

In practical terms, this statement must be true:

IDisposable db = GetDB();

If that compiles, you can put GetDB() in a using statement.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.