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Example:

SELECT
   (SELECT SUM(...) FROM ...) as turnover,
   (SELECT SUM(...) FROM ...) as cost,
   turnover - cost as profit

Sure this is invalid (at least in Postgres) but how to achieve the same in a query without rewriting the sub-query twice?

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Depends on details, such as columns & tables involved. –  OMG Ponies Nov 18 '10 at 23:13
    
@OMG Ponis: Like? Isn't there a general way for such? –  Wernight Nov 18 '10 at 23:20
    
I agree with @OMG. That said, if you can write one subquery that returns both turnover and cost as columns, the query wrapped around that subquery can perform turnover - cost. For more details, we'll need some details about your schema. –  Dan J Nov 18 '10 at 23:21
2  
Also consider using "common table expressions" aka CTE. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2686919/… and postgresql.org/docs/8.4/static/queries-with.html –  Vadzim Dec 11 '12 at 9:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Like so:

SELECT
   turnover,
   cost,
   turnover - cost as profit
from (
   (SELECT SUM(...) FROM ...) as turnover,
   (SELECT SUM(...) FROM ...) as cost
   ) as partial_sums
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Usually when you do select from table1, table2 you get the CROSS JOIN of the two tables. What does select from (table1, table2) as bla (as you have here) do with the two tables? –  Charl Botha Jan 21 at 9:15
    
@CharlBotha: it's not select from (foo, bar). It's [select] (select sum from foo), (select sum from bar) [from nothing]. –  Denis de Bernardy Jan 22 at 6:05
    
In your example above, you have ... from ((select ...) as turnover, (select ...) as cost) as partial_sums -- I'm still wondering how exactly the turnover and cost sub-selects are combined? –  Charl Botha Jan 22 at 7:09
    
@CharlBotha: they're two scalars, in very much the same way as you'd go select 1 as foo, 2 as bar. –  Denis de Bernardy Jan 22 at 10:12
    
Thank you very much! (I did not see that they were scalars, probably because I was struggling with an own example of a correlated subquery from which I was trying to aggregate multiple columns in different ways) –  Charl Botha Jan 22 at 13:54

Perhaps the sql "with" clause could help, as presented here http://orafaq.com/node/1879 (other databases such as Postgres do it as well, not just oracle).

Cheers! André

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1  
This feature is called "common table expressions" aka CTE. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2686919/… –  Vadzim Dec 11 '12 at 9:11

I think the following will work:

SELECT turnover, cost, turnover-cost as profit FROM
   (SELECT 1 AS FAKE_KEY, SUM(a_field) AS TURNOVER FROM some_table) a
INNER JOIN
   (SELECT 1 AS FAKE_KEY, SUM(a_nother_field) AS COST FROM some_other_table) b
USING (FAKE_KEY);

Not tested on animals - you'll be first! :-)

Share and enjoy.

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Actually I did a lot of work on this, and hit many brick walls, but finally figured out an answer - more of a hack - but it worked very well and reduced the read overhead of my queries by 90%....

So rather than duplictaing the correlated query many times to retrieve multiple columns from the subquery, I just concat all the values I want to return into a comma separated varchar, and then unroll them again in the application...

So instead of

select a,b,
(select x from bigcorrelatedsubquery) as x,
(select y from bigcorrelatedsubquery) as x,
(select z from bigcorrelatedsubquery) as z
from outertable

I now do

select a,b,
(select convert(varchar,x)+','+convert(varchar,x)+','+convert(varchar,x)+',' 
from bigcorrelatedsubquery) from bigcorrelatedquery) as xyz
from outertable
group by country

I now have all three correlated 'scalar' values I needed but only had to execute the correlated subquery once instead of three times.

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You could reuse the query like this:

WITH 
  TURNOVER AS (
    SELECT SUM(...) FROM ...)
  ),
  COST AS(
    SELECT SUM(...) FROM ...
  )

SELECT *
FROM(
 SELECT
   TURNOVER.sum as SUM_TURNOVER
 FROM
 TURNOVER,COST
 WHERE ....
) AS a

This is equivalent to :

SELECT *
FROM(
 SELECT
   TURNOVER.sum as SUM_TURNOVER
 FROM
 (
   SELECT SUM(...) FROM ...)
 )AS TURNOVER,
 (
   SELECT SUM(...) FROM ...
 )AS COST
 WHERE ....
) AS a

There is a point to note here. The first method is more readable and reusable, but the second method might be faster, because the DB might choose a better plan for it.

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SELECT turnover, cost, turnover - cost
FROM
(
SELECT
(SELECT ...) as turnover,
(SELECT ...) as cost
) as Temp
share|improve this answer
    
Those are table aliases, not column aliases... –  OMG Ponies Nov 18 '10 at 23:14
    
if turnover and cost are table aliases, you definitely can't do this: turnover - cost as profit –  Eric.K.Yung Nov 18 '10 at 23:17
    
Invalid: ERROR: subquery in FROM must have an alias HINT: For example, FROM (SELECT ...) [AS] foo. –  Wernight Nov 18 '10 at 23:22
    
In my query Temp is the alias for the subquery in FROM –  Eric.K.Yung Nov 18 '10 at 23:31

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