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I have this query I need to perform where I have to parse through a fields info matching it to another field in another table and then rinse and repeat across several tables, finally this results in the desired rows being returned.

The question is, how can I speed this up... it returns hundreds of thousands of rows and it's not working too well for my client in their admin section as the query is causing a crash.

Here is the query:

SELECT DISTINCT t1.CU_ship_name1, t1.CU_ship_name2, t1.CU_email 
FROM (
      SELECT CU_id, CU_ship_name1, CU_ship_name2, CU_email
      FROM customers 
      WHERE CU_solicit=1 
      AND CU_cdate >=".$startDate." 
      AND CU_cdate <=".$endDate."
     )AS t1
INNER JOIN orders AS t2 ON t1.CU_id = t2.O_cid 
INNER JOIN item AS t3 ON t2.O_ref = t3.I_oref 
INNER JOIN product AS t4 ON t3.I_pid = t4.P_id 
INNER JOIN (
            SELECT C_id FROM category WHERE C_store_type =1
           ) AS t5 ON t4.P_cat = t5.C_id

The 'customers','orders','item' tables get updated with tens of thousands of new rows every month and the 'product' table receives atleast one-hundred new rows every month.

The only thing I could think to do was to create a new table that holds this info (which is not an ideal solution), and add an index to these tables. I fear the index since these tables get such a large number of new data but I am willing to try it (can always undo it right?). However I do not believe that the index will fix the issue by itself.

UPDATE: I am now using this query and getting faster results, indexing all the WHERE and JOIN ON rows didn't help much at all...I can't figure out why.

Removing subqueries:

had a disasterous effect on my query speed as well from 3-4 seconds on the query below to 151 with the same perameters.

SELECT DISTINCT t1.CU_ship_name1, t1.CU_ship_name2, t1.CU_email 
FROM customers AS t1 
WHERE t1.CU_solicit=1 
AND t1.CU_cdate>= 20100725000000
AND t1.CU_cdate<= 20100801000000
AND EXISTS(
    SELECT NULL FROM orders AS t2
    INNER JOIN item AS t3 ON t2.O_ref = t3.I_oref 
    INNER JOIN product AS t4 ON t3.I_pid = t4.P_id 
    INNER JOIN (
        SELECT C_id 
        FROM category 
        WHERE C_store_type = 2
    ) AS t5 ON t4.P_cat = t5.C_id
    WHERE t1.CU_id = t2.O_cid);

Nevermind, I changed them to normal joins and no subqueries and this thing is lightening fast now after everything. Here is the query now:

SELECT DISTINCT t1.CU_ship_name1, t1.CU_ship_name2, t1.CU_email 
FROM customers AS t1 
JOIN orders AS t2 ON t1.CU_id = t2.O_cid 
JOIN item AS t3 ON t2.O_ref = t3.I_oref 
JOIN product AS t4 ON t3.I_pid = t4.P_id 
JOIN category AS t5 ON t4.P_cat = t5.C_id 
WHERE t1.CU_solicit =1 
AND t1.CU_cdate >=20100425000000
AND t1.CU_cdate <=20100801000000
AND t5.C_store_type =2
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd try two things:

1) Add indexes on the columns you use in the ON and WHERE clauses

2) Eliminate the subqueries by rewriting them as normal JOINs and WHERE conditions

Only once you've done those and found you're still having a problem should you consider other options.

This really looks like a pretty simple query, other than the unnecessary subqueries. You would not expect it to be slow with even millions of rows unless you don't have indexes defined, you have far too little memory available to MySQL, or you've configured the MySQL server itself very poorly for the resources available.

Ten thousand new rows a month is nothing. You're putting in a new row once every several minutes. That's not even a consideration when deciding what indexes to define. MySQL on a cheap server can handle hundreds of inserts per second.

share|improve this answer

I would index the columns in your where Criteria as well as in your ON statements. The indexes will immediately address your crashing problem, and probably not degrade your modify operations significantly. Tens of thousands of rows every month is not actually that many rows -- unless your DB is on a weak machine.

In addition, I would look into removing the subqueries entirely. They often slow down sql server performance. You may also want to look into moving the query into a stored procedure so the server has a chance at caching its execution plan.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I have indexed the ON and WHERE columns but it has not made any noticeable difference, any other suggestions? Also, removing the took me from 6-9seconds on my test parameters to 151seconds...soo it went the complete other way as far as subqueries go so now im confused hah. – BinarySolo00100 Nov 19 '10 at 20:40
    
Alright, I got, on a side note I might know you from a job you hired me for in San Diego @ SMS, if that is you I hope you are doing well, Tanner Smith. – BinarySolo00100 Nov 19 '10 at 20:56
    
Woah -- what's up Tanner! How you been? Maybe we should take this chat to fb or e-mail :) What was the winning combination of fixes? – Macy Abbey Nov 20 '10 at 7:06
    
Ah, nevermind on what the winning combination was, I'm reading your edited post. – Macy Abbey Nov 20 '10 at 7:07

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