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I have this code:

void Main()
{
    List<Employee> employeeList;

    employeeList = new List<Employee>
    {
        {new Employee("000001", "DELA CRUZ, JUAN T.")},
        {new Employee("000002", "GOMEZ, MAR B.")},
        {new Employee("000003", "RIVERA, ERWIN J.")}
    };

    employeeList.Dump();
}

public class Employee
{
    public string EmployeeNo { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Employee(string employeeNo, string name)
    {
        this.EmployeeNo = employeeNo;
        this.Name = name;
    }   
}

How should I make a new instance of Employee class using the properties only and add that instance to the employeeList (I mean not using the class constructor of employee)?

I already made a solution but it's too lengthy. How should I shorten it?

void Main()
{   
    List<Employee> employeeList;

    #region - I want to shorten these lengthy codes. 
    Employee employee1 = new Employee();
    employee1.EmployeeNo = "000001";
    employee1.Name = "DELA CRUZ, JUAN T.";

    Employee employee2 = new Employee();
    employee2.EmployeeNo = "000002";
    employee2.Name = "GOMEZ, MAR B.";
    // other employees...
    #endregion

    employeeList = new List<Employee>
    {
        employee1,
        employee2
    };

    employeeList.Dump();
}

public class Employee
{
    public string EmployeeNo { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }    
}
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could do this

var list = new List<Employee> 
{
  new Employee {EmployeeNo = "000001", Name = "Peter Pan"}, 
  new Employee {EmployeeNo = "000002", Name = "King Kong"}
};

of this

public class EmployeeList : List<Employee>
{
    public void Add(string no, string name)
    {
        this.Add(new Employee(no, name));
    }
}

var list = new EmployeeList 
{ 
  { "000001", "Peter Pan" }, 
  { "000002", "King Kong"} 
};
share|improve this answer
    
great....! thanks :) – yonan2236 Nov 19 '10 at 1:35
    
+1, didn't know you could use your own overload of the Add method – cordialgerm Nov 19 '10 at 3:42

You could do something like that

var employee1 = New Employee() { EmployeeNo = "000001", Name = "DELA CRUZ, JUAN T." };
share|improve this answer

How about this?

void Main()
{   
    var employeeList = new List<Employee> {
                            new Employee { EmployeeNo = "000001", Name = "DELA CRUZ, JUAN T." },
                            new Employee { EmployeeNo = "000002", Name = "GOMEZ, MAR B." }
                       };

    employeeList.Dump();
}

public class Employee
{
    public string EmployeeNo { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }    
}
share|improve this answer

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