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I'm sure I've done this in the past and there is something small I'm forgetting, but how can I sort a CSV file on a certain column? I'm interested in answers with and without 3rd party Perl modules. Mainly methods without, since I don't always have access to install additional modules.

Example data:

name,25,female
name,24,male
name,27,female
name,21,male

desired end result after sorting on the 2nd numeric column:

name,21,male
name,24,male
name,25,female
name,27,female
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6 Answers 6

As CSV is a pretty complex format, it is better to use a module that does the work for us.

Following is an example using the Text::CSV module:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use constant AGE => 1;

use Text::CSV;

my $csv = Text::CSV->new();

my @rows;
while ( my $row_ref = $csv->getline( \*DATA ) ) {
    push @rows, $row_ref;
}

@rows = sort { $a->[AGE] <=> $b->[AGE] } @rows;

for my $row_ref (@rows) {
    $csv->combine(@$row_ref);
    print $csv->string(), "\n";
}

__DATA__
name,25,female
name,24,male
name,27,female
name,21,male
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3  
nice answer. It’s really tempting to just run a split /,/, but that isn’t at all good enough for the Micro$oft-style CSV files. I don’t think it’s even good enough for Unix colon-separated foocap files. –  tchrist Nov 19 '10 at 2:55
    
tchrist: True. Great to receive a comment from you sir! Thank you. :-) –  Alan Haggai Alavi Nov 19 '10 at 3:12
    
New to Perl. Is this an in-memory solution? are there easy ways to do the same thing with big files? thanks –  Gevorg Jun 4 '13 at 17:55

There is also DBD::CSV:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict; use warnings;
use DBI;

my $dbh = DBI->connect('dbi:CSV:', undef, undef, {
    RaiseError => 1,
    f_ext => '.csv',
    csv_tables => { test => { col_names => [qw' name age sex '] } },
});

my $sth = $dbh->prepare(q{
    SELECT name, age, sex FROM test ORDER BY age
});

$sth->execute;

while ( my @row = $sth->fetchrow_array ) {
    print join(',' => @row), "\n";
}

$sth->finish;
$dbh->disconnect;

Output:

name,21,male
name,24,male
name,25,female
name,27,female
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In the spirit of there always being another way to do it, bear in mind that plain old GNU sort might be enough.

$ sort -t, -k2 -n unsorted.txt
name,21,male
name,24,male
name,25,female
name,27,female

Where the command line args are:

-t, # use comma as the record separator
-k2 # sort on the second key (record) in the line
-n  # sort using numerical comparison (like using <=> instead of cmp in perl)

If you want a Perl solution, wrap it in qx() ;-)

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The original poster asked for no third-party modules (which I take to mean nothing from CPAN). Whilst this is restriction that will horribly limit your ability to write good modern Perl code, in this instance it's possible using the (core) Text::ParseWords module in place of the (non-core) Text::CSV. So, borrowing heavily from Alan's example, we get:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Text::ParseWords;

my @rows;

while (<DATA>) {
    push @rows, [ parse_line(',', 0, $_) ];
}

@rows = sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] } @rows;

foreach (@rows) {
    print join ',', @$_;
}

__DATA__
name,25,female
name,24,male
name,27,female
name,21,male
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When you provide your own comparison code, you can sort on anything. Just extract the desired element with a regex, or probably a split in this case, and then compare on that. If you have a lot of elements, I would parse the data into a list of lists and then the comparison code can access it without parsing. That would eliminate parsing the same row over and over as it's compared with other rows.

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I would do something like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my @rows = map { chomp; [split /[,\s]+/, $_] } <DATA>; #read each row into an array
my @sorted = sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] } @rows; # sort the rows (numerically) by second column

for (@sorted) {
  print join(', ', @$_) . "\n"; # print them out as CSV
}

__DATA__
name,25,female
name,24,male
name,27,female
name,21,male
share|improve this answer
1  
Fine, as long as you have no John Doe, Esq. among your names. –  reinierpost Nov 19 '10 at 10:20
    
There's a reason why we have CSV parsing modules like Text::CSV. Just splitting on a comma is not enough in the general case. –  Dave Cross Nov 19 '10 at 11:13

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