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Some have the habit of adding header file imports/includes to the header file. Some on the other hand, write a forward declaration in the header file and write the actual #include or #import lines in the implementation file.

Is there a standard practice for this? Which is better and why?

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up vote 9 down vote accepted

Given X.h and X.c, if you #include everything from X.h then clients of "X" that #include <X.h> will also include all those headers, even though some may only be needed in X.c.

X.h should include only what's needed to parse X.h. It should assume no other headers will have been included by the translation unit to ensure that reordering inclusions won't break a client. X.c should include any extras needed for implementation.

This minimises recompilation dependencies. You don't want a change only to the implementation to affect the header and hence trigger a client recompilation. You should simply include directly from X.c.

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Including forward references instead of headers is necessary when classes have shallow dependencies. For example:

A.h

#include "B.h"
class A {
   B* pointer;
};

B.h

#include "A.h"
class B {
   A* pointer;
};

Will break at compilation.

A.h

class B;
class A {
   B* pointer;
};

B.h

class A;
class B {
   A* pointer;
};

Will work as each class only needs to know the other class exists at the declaration.

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Is it a good design/architecture to have circular dependencies like this in real world? – Mugunth Nov 19 '10 at 3:50
1  
No, it's not, it should be avoided at all times possible. If it's unavoidable, and two modules NEED to be mutually included, in 99% of cases they are semantically one and the same module, or can be supermodules of a combined, basic module that both depend on. – slezica Nov 19 '10 at 3:53
1  
It's better practice to provide forward declaration headers for A and B, that contain only "class A", and "class B" respectively, and are both included by each of A.h and B.h. That way, A's forward declaration, declaration and implementation are naturally cross-referenced when building anything from A (including its test cases), so a change from class A to say some template and typedef won't leave B lying to the compiler about what A is. – Tony D Nov 19 '10 at 4:13
    
@Santiago: Yes, circular dependencies in software modules is usually bad practice. But in individual classes circular references are both common and necessary in many cases. Off the top of my head, parent pointers usually create circular references. – Akusete Nov 19 '10 at 5:07
    
And really, I'm not advocating their use at all, just explaining a situation when forward declarations must be used. I don't understand why you would down vote. – Akusete Nov 19 '10 at 5:10

I write my imports in header files, so that every implementation file has only one inclusion directive. This also has the advantage of hiding dependencies from the user of the module's code.

However, that same hiding has a disadvantage: your module's user may be importing all kinds of other headers included in your header that he may not need at all. From that point of view, it's better to have the inclusion directives in the implementation file, even if it means manually resolving dependencies, because it leads to lighter code.

I don't think there's a single answer. Considering the reasons I gave, I prefer the first approach, I think it leads to cleaner code (albeit heavier and possibly with unnecessary imports).

I don't remember who I'm quoting (and thus the phrase is not exact), but I always remember reading: "programs are written for human beings to read, and ocasionally for computers to execute". I don't particularly care if there are a few kilobytes of code the user of my module won't need, as long as he can cleanly, easily import it and use it with a single directive.

Again, I think it's a matter of taste, unless there's something I failed to consider. Comments are more than welcome in that case!

Cheers.

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4  
Sorry - but your logic's messed up and your preference opposite to well-established best practice. 1st paragraph: "This also has the advantage of hiding dependencies from the user of the module's code." / "as long as he can cleanly, easily import it and use it with a single directive". You should include what's necessary to parse the header, any other headers needed only for the implementation won't have to be included for the client to use the functionality anyway. (Either way, the client still has to add linker dependencies on objects/libraries.) – Tony D Nov 19 '10 at 4:25
    
I honestly don't see how my logic is messed up. It's not the same to add a file to the compilation line, than to force someone to import several modules in his code. What I do see is how you are highly disrispectful, however, so please refrain from commenting any further. I'll take a look at articles on this myself, and make up my mind. – slezica Nov 19 '10 at 15:27

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