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Hopefully I can ask this in an understandable way...

Overall, I am trying to determine what type of object I am currently dealing with.

I'm creating a collection (HTML is example, not literal) and I need to filter my collection to certain elements eg:

        <div id="tabContentWrap">
            <div id="tab">
                <a href="http://somelink">Link Element</a><img src="img.jpg" alt="img" />
                <select id="my_select"><option value="1">1</option></select>
            </div>
        </div>

function getFilteredElements() {
    var tabContent = getElementsByClass("tabContentWrap", document.getElementById(tabWrapId), "div");

    for (var j = 0; j < tabContent.length; j++){
        tabContentLinks = tabContent[j].getElementsByTagName('*');
        for (var k = 0; k < tabContentLinks.length; k++){
            // Here i attempt to filter the collection
            if (tabContentLinks[k] == '[object HTMLSelectElement]') {
                alert("found select list");
            }
         }
     }
 }

Which works fine in Mozilla but not in Internet Explorer 8, tabContentLinks[k] returns [object] instead of [object 'ObjectType']

So I investigated and discovered that you can use Object.prototype.toString.call(object) to get the object type, which again works fine in Mozilla but returns [object Object] in IE8...

I call

get_type(tabContentsLink[k]);

which runs the following function:

function get_type(thing){
    if (thing === null) return "[object Null]";
    // special case
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(thing);
}

But this just returns [object Object]

Does Object.prototype.toString.call() ever return the type of object in IE or am I very far off and barking up a lamppost instead of a tree?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Well, first of all I want to tell you that Object.prototype.toString returns the value of the object's internal [[Class]] property, it isn't really a Type.

The value of this internal property represents the specification defined classification of an object (more info here).

Javascript has only 6 language types: Object, String, Number, Boolean, Null and Undefined, that's it.

The value of the [[Class]] internal property for host objects -as DOM elements- can be anything, it is completely implementation-dependent, on built-in objects is safe to use it -except with some exceptions in IE as @Alex pointed out in the article linked in his answer-.

You are working with DOM elements, and you want to figure out what kind of node it is, my suggestion to this, is to simply use the nodeName property (please avoid using tagName).

The nodeName property contains the name of the node you are dealing it, in upper case, therefore you could use it as this:

function getFilteredElements() {
  var tabContent = getElementsByClass("tabContentWrap", 
  document.getElementById(tabWrapId), "div");

  for (var j = 0; j < tabContent.length; j++){
    tabContentLinks = tabContent[j].getElementsByTagName('*');
    for (var k = 0; k < tabContentLinks.length; k++){
      // Here i attempt to filter the collection
      if (tabContentLinks[k].nodeName == 'SELECT') { // <- SELECT elements
        alert("found select list");
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Beauty in simplicity - thank you. Now I understand the differences in terminology and functionality. Great stuuf –  dpmguise Nov 19 '10 at 7:01
    
@Alex, Thanks!, now that I see you, maybe tomorrow, I'll update my answer to your question, little things changed on the spec., and I will reword some parts of it :) –  CMS Nov 19 '10 at 7:06
    
@dpmguise, You're welcome! I'm glad to help :) –  CMS Nov 19 '10 at 7:07
    
@dpmguise, PS: Don't forget to declare your tabContentLinks variable. If you just make an assignment, and the variable isn't found on the outer scope, it will become a property of the global object (an implicit global), moreover, this is disallowed on the new ECMAScript 5 Strict Mode, a ReferenceError exception is thrown on this kind of undeclared assignments -always use var :)... –  CMS Nov 19 '10 at 7:16
    
@CMS: What's your objection to tagName? –  Tim Down Nov 19 '10 at 10:27

Rather than recreate the entire discussion and possible solutions, I'll just point you to a blog post that discusses this exact issue.

share|improve this answer
    
So, does that mean I have to create a circumstance for each element I wish to filter? Those (and many other) examples deal with isArray, do I have to make an isSelect and isImage functions? That's the impression I am getting... –  dpmguise Nov 19 '10 at 5:49
    
@dpmguise in IE9 beta this is fixed. For right now, yeah, that's how I'd go about it, but there may be better ways. –  Alex Nov 19 '10 at 5:56
    
Ugh.. the joys... thanks :) –  dpmguise Nov 19 '10 at 5:59
    
@dpmguise indeed. Have..er..fun? with that. :) –  Alex Nov 19 '10 at 6:00
1  
Hmm, that blog post is about an specific problem, Object.prototype.toString with Array objects from other frames, the OP problem is regarding the fact that Host objects -as DOM elements- in IE<9 don't have defined a special value for their [[Class]] internal property... –  CMS Nov 19 '10 at 6:08

I believe IE will return simple data types, but everything else is just an object. It's a browser limitation. I don't know if IE9 is improving the situation, but that probably wouldn't help you anyway.

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I don't have IE handy, but the proper way in Firefox is to use object.constructor.name (object.constructor being the object's constructor, .name being the function name).

function Xyz() {}
new Xyz().constructor.name === 'Xyz'

But then, also,

var Abc = function() {}
new Abc().constructor.name === 'Abc'
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, unfortunatley I have tried that and I get 'undefined' in IE. –  dpmguise Nov 19 '10 at 5:57
    
Ah well. That's a pity. –  Chris Morgan Nov 19 '10 at 6:50

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