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If an exception is thrown in a C++ program control is either transferred to the exception handler or terminate() is called.

Even if the program emits some diagnostics from inside the handler (or from terminate() handler) that can be too late - the most value is in the call stack at the point where the exception is thrown, not in the handler.

On Windows a call stack can be obtained using [StackWalk64()]1 function. The key is how to call that function at the right moment.

Is there a way to make a Visual C++ program execute some user code each time an exception (or an exception for which no handler is set) is thrown?

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1  
C++ exception or SEH? –  Chubsdad Nov 19 '10 at 9:01

6 Answers 6

If you want to do stuff when an SEH exception is thrown, such as when an access violation occurs, then you can simply catch the SEH exception (either with a __finally, or with a conversion to a C++ exception (see here)) and access the context within the exception which is the context at the time the exception was thrown. You can then generate either a callstack using StackWalker or a mini dump. IMHO it's better to produce a mini dump.

If you want to catch C++ exceptions at the point they're thrown and you don't have access to the source to the C++ exception classes then you need to get a bit craftier. I deal with this problem by running the target process under a custom debugger - use the Debug API (see here) which gets notifications of when an exception is thrown. At that point you can create a mini dump or call stack of the target process.

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On Windows I'm using SetUnhandledExceptionFilter and MiniDumpWriteDump to produce a minidump.

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__try, __except are very helpful.

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Is there a way to make a Visual C++ program execute some user code each time an exception (or an exception for which no handler is set) is thrown?

Put that code into the constructor of your exception base class.

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Good idea, but won't help if some unrelated exception is thrown. –  sharptooth Nov 19 '10 at 9:19
    
@sharptooth: You can perform exception translation. It was always a good idea for me to wrap library exceptions (from Boost for example) in my own exception types. –  Daniel Lidström Nov 26 '10 at 10:33
    
@Daniel Lidström: Yes, exception translation is great, but it's often useful to know where the original exception came from. –  sharptooth Nov 26 '10 at 10:51

When the language doesn't support it, and you can't live without it, hack... :-/

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

namespace Throw_From
{
    struct Line
    {
        Line& set(int x) { x_ = x; return *this; }
        int x_;

        template <typename T>
        void operator=(const T& t) const
        {                                                                       
            throw t;
        }                                                                       
    };                                                                          
    Line line;                                                                  
}                                                                               

#define throw Throw_From::line.set(__LINE__) =                                  

void fn2()                                                                      
{                                                                               
    throw std::runtime_error("abc");                                            
}                                                                               

void fn1()                                                                      
{                                                                               
    fn2();                                                                      
}                                                                               

int main()                                                                      
{                                                                               
    try
    {
        fn1();
    }
    catch (const std::runtime_error& x)
    {
        std::cout << Throw_From::line.x_ << '\n';
    }
}
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1  
This won't work as written because throw has higher precedence than ,; you end up throwing Throw_From::line, not "ouch". –  James McNellis Nov 19 '10 at 9:14
3  
Actually, this also has the bigger problem that you are not allowed to define a macro lexically identical to a keyword if you include any of the standard library headers, so #define throw whatever is out of the question. –  James McNellis Nov 19 '10 at 9:24
1  
@James: generally when people start thinking about calling platform specific stack dumps in exception situations, they don't care about portability or the Standard and will check their headers to see if it works. Lesser of evils and all that. (Hmmm... can't overload operator, - too late too) –  Tony D Nov 19 '10 at 9:31
1  
#define THROW(E) (do_stuff(), (throw E)) –  Fred Nurk Nov 19 '10 at 9:34
1  
@Tony: Those people compound a bad situation by making it worse with undetected UB. –  Fred Nurk Nov 19 '10 at 9:36

This is a great article on how to catch all different types of exceptions in Visual C++.
It also provides you with a crash dump that comes useful for debugging.

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